Woodgate Philip, sen.

Woodgate Philip, sen.

Male 1776 -

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  • Suffix  sen. 
    Born  1776 
    Gender  Male 
    Person ID  I545  My Genealogy
    Last Modified  23 Jan 2014 

    Family  Culley Maria,   b. 1781,   d. 1846, Norwich Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  1799  Witton by North, Walsham, Norfolk Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    >1. Woodgate Philip, jun.,   b. 1802, Norwich Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1872, Camberwell london Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified  7 Feb 2013 
    Family ID  F207  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1799 - Witton by North, Walsham, Norfolk Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos

    » Slide Show
    view of Witton church across fields, Suffolk
    view of Witton church across fields, Suffolk
    1841 census record for Philip and Maria Woodgate and the next generation of Philip and wife Harriett and children, in Norwich
    1841 census record for Philip and Maria Woodgate and the next generation of Philip and wife Harriett and children, in Norwich
    1824 Polling register for Philip Woodgate, manufacturer, in the Mancroft Ward of St Stephens, Norwich
    1824 Polling register for Philip Woodgate, manufacturer, in the Mancroft Ward of St Stephens, Norwich
    1830 Poll register for Phillip Woodgate, Merchant, St Stephens, Norwich
    1830 Poll register for Phillip Woodgate, Merchant, St Stephens, Norwich
    1830 record for Philip Woodgate in Pigot's Directory
    1830 record for Philip Woodgate in Pigot's Directory
    registered at Livington's Court, Market Place, Norwich. Under the section 'Bombasin and Crape Manufacturers'.
    Wikipedia: Bombazine, or bombasine, is a fabric originally made of silk or silk and wool. It is twilled or corded and used for dress-material. Black bombazine was once used largely for mourning wear, but the material had gone out of fashion by the beginning of the 20th century. The word is derived from the obsolete French bombasin, applied originally to silk but afterwards to tree-silk or cotton. Bombazine is said to have been made in England in Elizabeth Iís reign, and early in the 19th century it was largely made at Norwich.
    cartoon showing dress of bombazine on left
    cartoon showing dress of bombazine on left
    1807 caricature engraved by Charles Williams after a drawing by Woodward, which presents an (exaggerated) contrast between "The Year 1740: A Lady's full dress of Bombazeen" (i.e. bombazine or bombasine, a heavy corded fabric) and "The year 1807: A Lady's undress of Bum-be-seen:
    1845 record for Philip Woodgate sen, showing he was still alive at this date
    1845 record for Philip Woodgate sen, showing he was still alive at this date
    Woodgate Philip, sen. 2 Post Office st, house Crescent

  • Notes 
    • Marriage record 1799:
      Philip Woodgate married Maria Culley
      At Witton, by North Walsham Norfolk

      ++++++++++

      Phillip Woodgate, Woolcomber, Magdalen street, Norwich, sat on the Committee of Woolcombers.
      This was "Appointed by Act of Parliament for 'More effectually preventing abuses & Frauds committed by persons employed in the Manufactories of Combing wool and worsted yarn,' in Norfolk and Norwich."
      source: "A Concise History and Directory of the City of Norwich for 1811"

      1830 mentioned in the Law Advertiser vol 8, p.379:
      'INSOLVENY DECLARATIONS
      Assignments for benefit of Creditors
      11 Aug 1830 LASSCOCK William, Downham Market, Norfolk, Draper. Trustees: Henry Saffery of Downham Market, Grocer and Draper, and Philip Woodgate of Norwich, Draper.'

      Also mentioned in same book with his son:
      1830 Law Advertiser vol 8, p.420:
      'BANKRUPTS
      Town and Country Commissions
      Gazette Tues Nov 2
      BURNE Thomas, Joseph smith and Philip Woodgate, the younger, of Watling street in the city of London, Warehousemen. To surrender Nov 12 at 10, Nov 16 at 12, and Dec 14 at 11. Sol. W Fisher, Walbrooke. Pet. Cred. Philip Woodgate, Sen. Norwich, warehouseman.'

      source: http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=AuMuAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA420&lpg=PA420&dq=phillip+woodgate+norwich+manufacturer&source=bl&ots=OonW9lPpA2&sig=_U4y_HiVKDJH44weCM_ayzhPTgc&hl=en&sa=X&ei=JpwTUfzUHaO60QXtnIC4DA&sqi=2&ved=0CEMQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=phillip%20woodgate%20norwich%20manufacturer&f=false

      ++++++++++

      1836 'History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Norfolk, and the City and County of the City of Norwich', p.203:
      MANUFACTURERS (SILK & WORSTED)
      Woodgate Phillip, Livingstone's ct, Market pl.; h.14 crescent
      Woodgate Pp. jun, Bethel st.

      source: http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=UUMJAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA203&lpg=PA203&dq=phillip+woodgate+norwich+manufacturer&source=bl&ots=ARe4_LsPD5&sig=yqOWChHbzdIHKTVfieXjgDzxZFc&hl=en&sa=X&ei=LqYTUeKLF8bL0AX7goCIDQ&ved=0CFgQ6AEwBzgK#v=onepage&q=phillip%20woodgate%20norwich%20manufacturer&f=false

      ++++++


      1841 Census:
      The Woodgate family live in St Stephens parish, Norwich.
      Grandfather Phillip Woodgate is ahead of the house aged 65, a merchant, his wife Maria is aged 70
      [young] Phillip Woodgate is aged 35, and also a Merchant
      Harrietta his wife is aged 35
      grandson Phillip is aged 10
      Grand-daughter Maria aged 3
      Grandson Harry aged 1

      +++++++++
      Excerpts from a 'Concise History and Directory of the City of Norwich for 1811' Containing besides the Lists, a variety of LOCAL INFORMATION, useful and interesting To RESIDENTS and STRANGERS.
      by C. Berry

      "Norwich, in its present state, is said to p. 2occupy more ground, comparatively with its population, than any city in the kingdom, being much interspersed with gardens, and it is frequently stiled, a city in an orchard; its shape is irregular, and may not unaptly be compared to a shoulder of mutton?it is full one mile and a half in length, and a mile and quarter broad. It contains thirty four churches and a number of chapels and meeting houses, besides the cathedral; it has five bridges over the river; it was formerly nearly surrounded with a wall, planted with forty two towers and had twelve gates, the former is dilapidated the latter, within a few years have been taken down.

      ...At what period the art of manufacturing cloth from wool was first introduced in this Island, is not certain; but it may be supposed it was early practised in Norfolk, from the circumstance of spinning with the distaff, being still retained here...The author of the Tour through the Island of Great Britain, in 1724, gives a statement which was furnished by a manufacturer, whereby p. 12it appears 120,000 persons were employed in the various branches of the Norwich manufactory...At present, the merchants being shut out of foreign markets by war, and from our own by fashion, the number of hands employed must be considerably reduced. The principal articles of this manufactory, are bombazines and broad camblets, for the latter, of which the East India Company, have annually given large orders.
      ...The staple manufactory of Norwich, furnishes about fifty distinct occupations from the shearer of the sheep to the mariner who ships the goods. The earnings of the different artizens are various?men from 6s. to 30s. per week; women from 5s. to 15s. and children, by spinning, filling and tire drawing, from 1s. to 4s. The combing of wool used to employ a great number of hands; but since the invention of machines, their employ is in a great measure superseded.

      ...A gentleman desirous of spending a few days in Norwich, cannot help being gratified by seeing the various employments of its extensive manufactories in Stuffs, Cottons, Shawls &c.?the first and last of which are here carried to a perfection no where else to be met with in England.

      Norwich adds greatly to the trade of Yarmouth, by the importation of about 40,000 p. 45chaldrons of coals yearly; wine, fish, oil, Irish yarn, and all heavy goods which come from thence by the river Yare: and in Peace the exportation of its manufactures to Russia, Germany, Holland, Denmark, Norway, Spain, Portugal, Italy, &c. The keels and wherries which navigate between Norwich and Yarmouth are acknowledged to be superior to any other small craft in England, for carrying a larger burthen, and being worked at a smaller expence.

      ...Norwich has experienced of late years, a number of improvements; the lighting is much more brilliant, and better regulated than formerly; the paving also, which is in great forwardness, and the alterations consequent thereon, have already much improved many parts, and will when finished, add greatly to the beauty of the city, and to the convenience and comfort of the inhabitants and occasional visitors."

      there is a great deal more detail about the city from the transcript of the book here:
      http://www.gutenberg.org/files/32829/32829-h/32829-h.htm





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