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351 Known in family as 'Aunt Pegs'. Good golfer, worldly wise, loving great-aunt. Whitty Marguerite Eleanor Hamlyn
 
352 she died unmarried Whitty Mary
 
353 they had 2 sons and 2 daughters Whitty Mary
 
354 1891 Census info:
Whitty family lives in Westbury on Trym, Gloucestershire.
They live in Ivywell House
Henry Hamlyn Whitty is head of household aged 19, and is a student of civil engineering.
siblings Eleanor, John, Marie and Elsie are all scholars.
there are 4 domestic servants in the household.
Parents Henry and Mary must have been away

1901 Census info:
Whitty family live in Dewhurst, in Wadhurst Sussex.
Head of family is Henry T Whitty aged 53 'living on own means', Mary aged 23 and Elsie aged 21 also living there. Four domestic servants in the house.

 
Whitty Mary Eliza
 
355 8th Dec 1922 Passenger List
On board the 'Benalla' from Melbourne, arriving in London were Henry Whitty (grazier aged 50), Margurite Whitty (wife, aged 39), Margurite Whitty (scholar aged 17), John Whitty (aged 12) and Mary H whitty aged 9.
their home address is Dewhurst Lodge, Wadhurst, Sussex 
Whitty Mary Hamlyn
 
356 Incoming Ship Passenger List 1933
28th April Mary Hamlyn Whitty, aged 20, arrived at Tilbury docks on board the "Erria". she had embarked at Malacca. Her home address is given as Dewhurst, Wadhurst, Sussex.  
Whitty Mary Hamlyn
 
357 no children Whitty Mary Hamlyn
 
358 Educated Clifton College and Sandhurst.

From 1898 Noel Irwine was sent to school at Clifton College Bristol, as had his two elder brothers. Family legend says that his parents were horrified to realise that he had been running wild at Tarramia and was practically illiterate although he could ride very well, and that his ambition was to run away and put his pick pocketing skills, learned from a jackaroo at Tarramia, to use in Sydney. His elder brother, John Tarlton, recounted that being able to ride well was also a considerable advantage to his career in the Indian Civil Service, since it enabled him to get about his district (Bihar) with ease and to play polo to competition standard.

joined Royal West Kent Regiment 1906. 1915-18 fought in Belgium and France, mentioned three times in dispatches, won the DSO in 1917. Commanded 2nd Battalion Royal West Kents 1932-1936. Officer in charge of Infantry Record and Pay office 1937-38. Commander 133rd Sussex and Kent Infantry Brigade 1938, retired 1941. Colonel of Queen's Own Royal West Kents 1946-48. Emigrated to Southern Rhodesia, died nr Salisbury.
Source: historical notes of Kennneth T Whitty 1970s.



 
Whitty Noel Irwin
 
359 Henry was appointed to the Curacy of the Union of Kilmurry and McMahon, Co Clare in 1839. He was Prebendary of Inniscattery and succeeded his grandfather as Rector of Kilrush in 1842.

source: research notes of Mary Whitty 
Whitty Rev Henry
 
360 they had 3 children: John, Irwine and Henry Whitty Rev Henry
 
361
After Irwine's death in 1832, William Palmer edited a book of letters and meditations written by Irwin; many of the letters were written to his first cousin William Palmer's wife Helen, whom he affectionately addressed as 'sister'. From these letters some details of his immediate family history and domestic life can be drawn.

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Mary Anne / Marianne's sister Eleanor married Irwine's younger brother John Whitty

source: research notes of Mary Whitty 
Whitty Rev Irwine
 
362 Irwine was a Rector who was murdered, no doubt because he was a keen enforcer of collecting tythes.

Curate of Cashel 1804 - 12, Rector of Glankeen, 1812 - 16 and Rector of Golden, Co Tipperary 1816 - 32. Irwine was also closely involved in the disturbances over the payment of tithes.

These became more intense following the enactment of the Tithe Composition Act of 1823. The tithe traditionally took the form of corn, eggs and poultry but the 1823 Act allowed the clergy to claim the monetary equivalent for the produce. Such valuations were seen as notoriously unjust, not least because the price of corn fell by almost 25% between 1820 and 1830. The 1823 Act also greatly increased the amount of land liable to payment.

Irwine's murder in 1832 was widely reported.

"Murdered in a field near his own house at Golden, six miles from Tipperary, the rev. Irvine Whitty rector of that parish. He was the eldest son of the rev. Irwine Whitty, of Kilrush, and brother to the rev. John Whitty, archdeacon of Kilfenora, and to major Whitty of the 26th regiment. This gentleman fell a victim to his perseverance in enforcing his tithes, for which he brought forty-five suits at the late sessions at Cashel. The verdict of the coroner's inquest was 'willful murder gainst persons as yet unknown'
The Annual Register
24 January 1832"

24 January 1832
"The Rev. Irwin Whitty, Rector of Golden, in the diocese pf Cashel, STONED TO DEATH, on his return home from the sick-bed of one of his parishioners."
The British Magazine

27 January 1832
"Rev. Irwin Whitty, Parish of Golden, Died in consequence of the wounds and injuries which he received on the head the evening of Wed. 25th inst., inflicted by some person or persons unknown.
Co Tipperary Coroners Inquests."

source: research notes of Mary Whitty

++++++++ 
Whitty Rev Irwine
 
363 John was also Rector of Rathvilly, Rathmore and Straboe 1804 - 43. He received this living (presumably on the death of his father) from the Crown for his loyal activity during the rebellion of 1798. He was honoured by the Grand Jury in 1800 and recommended to Lord Cornwallis (Lord Lieutenant of Ireland 1798 -1801) for saving the lives of 100 Protestant women and children during the attack on Ballickmoyler in May 1798.

source: research notes of Mary Whitty 
Whitty Rev John
 
364 "In the 1780’s, the resistance to the church tithes had led to the grassroots organization of agrarian resistance movements which would later develop into the White Feet of the 1830’s, a local version of the White Shirts, White Boys and other such movements. John Bowles, who was apparently taking in too few orders for perukes, had taken on the role of Land Agent for the Rev. John Whitty of Ballickmoyler.

In 1787, the Reverend Whitty, John Bowles and seven others armed with swords and three guns went on foot down to a distant part of his parish on the border of Kilkenny to execute a decree for the seizure of cattle in lieu of tithe payments which were long overdue. Having seized some cattle and on the point of returning home they were "attacked by a multitude armed with scythes, hangers, bayonets, pitchforks etc. who knocked down his people, swore they would hang his agent John Bowles, who was of the party, and whom they compelled to swear that he would never intermeddle with tithes there for the future [The Hibernian Magazine of January 1787]." The scare apparently worked as John doesn’t seem to have been involved in further such attempts. The Bowles family’s troubles with their neighbours were not over though.

In 1798 the United Irish Rebellion swept through that corner of Queen’s co. While the rebellion is accepted to have had both Catholic and Protestant roots united for a self-governing Ireland, the division in Ballickmoyler seems to have been upon religious lines. On May 24th, 1798 Ballickmoyler was the rallying point for pikemen who would then march on Carlow town in a coordinated attack with other bands approaching from the south. A local historian in Ballickmoyler told me that the rebels were jeered at by the Protestants in their houses prior to the band’s departure for Carlow but that may be just local legend.

At the Graigue Bridge which crosses the Barrow River into Carlow, the pikemen came up against two cannons, British troops and the Carlow Militia waiting for them. Turning around and returning to Ballickmoyler in frustration and finding the protestant homes deserted they then burned much of Ballickmoyler including the market and the houses of the 10 Protestant families which had already fled to the Rev. Whitty’s house, Providence Lodge, just outside town where they prepared to make a stand. Two of the houses burned belonged to John’s sons, Joseph and William [Commissioner’s List of Persons who have suffered Losses in their Property in the QUEEN’S COUNTY, April 6, 1799]. As John would have been in his late 70’s at the time it’s likely that one of those houses was his original house from the 1740’s which was now occupied by one of his sons.

The rebels pursued them and attacked Providence Lodge from which "Whitty and eleven other Protestants" kept up a spirited defense from 3:00am until word came at 6:00am of the great rebellion losses in Carlow at which point the remaining rebels disbanded into the country side leaving 21 dead around the Lodge [Memoirs of the Irish Rebellion of 1798, Richard Musgrave, 1802].

source: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bowlesfamily/LaoisHeritageSocietyArticle2008.htm 
Whitty Rev John
 
365 "In the published account it was rebels who were killed at Providence Lodge but another story of these events states that the Rev. Whitty’s house fell to the rebels before morning. It’s most likely that there were losses on both sides. In one account it was the English troops which pursued the rebels to Ballickmoyler who were responsible for burning the village. However it seems to me that once the number of Protestant’s homes which were burned is considered, it seems unlikely that it would have been the troops which did the burning… I don’t suppose we will ever know for sure."

source: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bowlesfamily/ACarlowFamilyInCanada.htm 
Whitty Rev John
 
366 "John was born in 1760 or 61 in Queen's county, the second son and heir of the Rev. Edward Whitty and his wife Mary Beere. It's not known yet exactly when Edward built Providence Lodge but John was resident there when a marriage bond was issued on Feb. 5, 1785 between John Whitty of Providence, Queen's county and Anne Groome of Castlecomer (both Protestants). In 1791 he was appointed as the Rector of Ballytarsney in co. Kilkenny which is described as having no church and requiring no service as the parishioners were two Protestant families, both gentlemen of property. He resigned this position on Aug. 31, 1804.

In 1798 during the United Irish Rebellion, the Protestant population of Ballickmoyler fled their homes and gathered at the Rev. John Whitty's home, Providence Lodge, just NW of town. The rebels had rallied at Ballickmoyler and then marched on to Carlow but were turned back at the Craigue bridge and returned to Ballickmoyler. Finding the Protestants had left the town they burned their houses and then attacked Providence Lodge with quite a significant loss of lives."

source: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bowlesfamily/the_revd_edward_whitty.htm 
Whitty Rev John
 
367 'On 24 May 1798, Providence Lodge was attacked by Irish rebels. A contemporary account in the memoirs of Richard Musgrave reads "(rebels) attacked the house of the reverend John Whitty, a protestant clergyman, near Arles, about five miles from Carlow; but it was bravely defended, by himself and eleven protestants, who kept up a constant fire, killed twenty-one rebels, and baffled all their attempts to storm or burn it. The conflict continued from three till six o'clock in the morning; when Mr. Whitty's ammunition being nearly expended, he sent two of his party to a neighbour to borrow more; but they were surrounded and overpowered after a gallant defence. The corpse of one of them, whom they killed, was mangled in a barbarous manner."'

source: http://www.ocotilloroad.com/geneal/whitty1.html#JOHN1 
Whitty Rev John
 
368 Following the attack on his house in 1798 the Rev. John Whitty put in a compensation claim for 66d 4s 9p for the damage done to his house, furniture and hay and for the loss of some sheep. In that compensation claim list you can also see the other claims for houses burned or damaged in Ballickmoyler including those of Joseph and William Bowles. He seems to have moved to Carlow very soon afterwards and possibly settled at Rathvilly as his signatures are on documents as a Magistrate in co. Carlow from 1800.

He later assumed his father's appointments as the Rector of Rathvilly from 1804-44. His wife, Mrs. Anne Whitty (Anne Groome, see below), died on Feb. 22, 1826 in Rathvilly.

In a repeat of his father's encounter with an agrarian resistance, John Whitty also pursued the policy of seizing livestock from tenants who were in default of their church tithes and was involved in at least two confrontations which required police and military intervention. In these two cases he had succeeded in seizing the cattle but was prevented from selling them for profit.
These two articles are from the The Times (of London, England):
The Times June 27 1833, p1, Iss 15202

"Ireland: Tithes: County of Carlow
The tithe sale held at Rathvilly on Saturday the 15th inst, on account of the Rev. Mr. Whitty (to attend which the extraordinary force of 30 of the 10th Hussars, 80 of the 43 foot and 80 police were ordered and led by Major Wallington) did not pass off without a riot. About a thousand persons attended who shouted and yelled most vehemently as 4 cows belonging to Mr Gahan were put up to auction. These were purchased eventually by the owner and the auctioneer was about to descend from his eminence when he was knocked down by a stone. The Rev Mr Whitty ran to his aid and fell in the confusion. The 10th Hussars then charged the crowd who dispersed in all directions and left the field to the military and police."

The Times Tues May 17 1836, p 3, Iss 16105
Ireland, Dublin, May 14

"Tithes (From the Carlow sentinel)
On Saturday last, the day appointed to hold an auction at Rathvilly, on several head of cattle, distrained for tithes due to the Rev Mr Whitty, the peasantry assembled so early as 5 o'clock in the morning from all parts of the neighbouring counties. Telegraphs were erected very systematically on the various hills between Rathvilly, Hacketstown and Castledermot, to give notice of the approach of the police, while horns were sounding in every direction within six miles of the scene of action. ... The cattle were set up for auction amid the most savage yells and bid for by one of Mr Whitty's men. This operated as a signal to commence an indiscriminate attack upon the devoted minister and his party which was accordingly made by a shower of stones and other missiles, when Giltrap, sen who bid for the cattle, fell having received a blow of a stone which fractured his skull, in the presence of the magistrate. Mr Whitty's life was in imminent danger, but he providentially escaped unhurt. A signal was then made for the police and military who ran to the spot in about 10 minutes, but by the preconcerted arrangements of the mob the cattle were carried off in triumph and the crowd dispersed before their arrival...."

A similar event occurred when the Whitty's associate, the Rev. La Touche attempted to sell some sheep he had seized at Tenekill in Queen's county. The Rev. John Whitty Sr.'s son, David La Touche Whitty was probably named after this gentleman.
He remarried in 1829 to Jane St. George and died in Rathvilly in 1843

source: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bowlesfamily/the_revd_edward_whitty.htm
 
Whitty Rev John
 
369 The Battle of Carlow:

"The town of Carlow was the location for a planned attack by the Rebel forces on those of the British crown in May 1798. Early in the morning of the 25th of May the Carlow rebels assembled in great numbers. They had come from various parts of the county - from Grange and Hacketstown, from Tullow and Leighlin and from other areas too. A further contingent from the Queen's County (Laois) planned to meet with them at Graigue Bridge.

When the Rebels entered the town of Carlow they were joined not only by the Catholic inhabitants but also by people who had secretly arrived there during the previous day and night. A crowd of approximately two hundred people marched through Tullow Street but when they reached Potato Market their fortunes changed.

There the Rebels progress was impeded and they came under fire from two sentinels. The Rebels had to abandon their plan to meet with the Queen's County Rebels at Graigue Bridge. Instead they were forced to cross Potato Market towards the gaol where they were further forced to retreat through Bridewell Lane, towards the courthouse [now the Deighton Hall]. Shots were fired and they were surrounded by soldiers. They threw down their arms and tried to beat a retreat along their original route. However because the Rebels feared that they would meet the army if they proceeded in that direction they retired into houses in Tullow Street which were already occupied by their own associates. The soldiers set fire to these
houses and some of the Rebels rushed outside and were immediately shot or bayoneted. Those unfortunates who remained inside were consumed by the flames. Other Rebels who had taken different routes of escape were shot by loyalists and those who initially escaped were pursued and killed by soldiers and yeomanry. The streets, roads and fields were strewn with the bodies of the fallen. The dead were borne on numerous carts to the far side of Graigue Bridge where they were buried in three gravel pits and covered with quick lime. It was said that there were over four hundred bodies buried there. Altogether it was said that a total of about six hundred people perished that day.

In the meantime the Queen's County Rebels having heard of theses events accordingly changed their route. They were led by men called Redmond and Brennan. They proceeded to Ballickmoyler, some miles outside Carlow but in the Queen's County [Laois] and there they set fire to loyalist houses and attacked the home of John Whitty, a Protestant clergyman. Twenty-one of the Rebels were killed in the fray but despite this that eventually overcame the loyalists. One of the loyalists called Richard Waters was just about to be executed when news of the Rebels' defeat at Carlow reached them. In the dismay and panic that ensued, Waters successfully persuaded them to lay down their arms and so his life was saved."

source: http://www.askaboutireland.ie/reading-room/history-heritage/history-of-ireland/1798-in-carlow/the-battle-of-carlow/
 
Whitty Rev John
 
370 they had 4 children Whitty Rev William
 
371 ++++++

'Edward Whitty was born about 1720 in Dublin. The Whitty Clan website states that he was the son of Thomas Whitty, a grocer of Dublin and Exeter, England. Another source says that he was the son of a Rev. John Whitty who was the son of Sir Walter Whitty of Ballyteigue Castle in the Parish of Kilmore in co. Wexford. He is mentioned in Church of Ireland records as being the Curate of Killabban Parish in 1766. That's in Queen's county (now co. Laois) and includes the Ballickmoyler/Castletown area. It's possible that he held that position continuously from the 1760's until he was replaced by the Rev'd. Anthony Weldon in 1792.

He's also mentioned in Volume 3 of Rev. M. Comerford's "Collections relating to the Diocese of Kildare and Leighlin" (1886) which states: 'In a Return dated 1731 (see Vol I. P. 269,) it is stated that there were in Killabban one Mass-house, two private chapels, four schoolmasters, and two priests; and that several itinerant priests, supposed to be regulars, frequently officiated in the said chapels....For the particulars supplied by a similar return, made, March 29th, 1766, by Edwd. Whitty, Protestant Curate'.

He was already living in Queen's county in the 1760's as his son, John, was born there in 1760 or 1761. but I'm not sure yet just where he lived at that point. There were at least three other children born to Edward and his wife, Mary Beere. Two of his sons, Irwin and John, would also enter the clergy [the other one joined the army]

He started buying land around Castletown/Ballickmoyler in 1768/69. I'm in the process of obtaining some of those deeds to help identify where he may have lived prior to then. Providence Lodge was probably built shortly after although the first reference I have found for it is in 1785 on his son's marriage bond. The Rev. Whitty was instituted as the Prebendary (Curate) of Killaloe (co. Clare) on Oct. 28, 1775. He was elevated to the position of Archbishop of Leighlin in 1777. However, he seems to have maintained his residence at Providence during these times as he is mentioned as living in Queen's county, about 5 miles from Carlow town in the following reference from 1787.

As the Archdeacon of Leighlin he would have been entitled to collect tithes from residents of his diocese. These tithes were assessed to provide the clergy of the Established Church (ie. The Church of Ireland) with a Living and were payable regardless of the resident's religion. The largely Catholic peasantry strongly objected to being required to pay for the support of a church other than their own especially when they were forbidden to practice their own religion. There were other grievances as well such as excluding grazing land from the tithe assessment. The larger land owners tended to convert their land from crops to grazing land while the peasantry had no choice but to operate theirs for food crops for their own subsistence. Therefore those who could best afford to pay and were actually members of the appropriate church did not have to while the Catholic peasantry were often kept at the poverty level.

This resulted in an agrarian resistance movement which sometimes took the form of large bands of men who would stand up against the armed guard which would accompany a tithe collector when the payment of tithes became overdue. Some often bloody battles could then occur. In an article in The Hibernian Magazine of 1787, the Rev. Archdeacon Whitley (certainly Whitty) is mentioned as having been attacked by a multitude of farmers/tenants when he went to seize cattle from them for their non-payment of church tithes owed to him. My ancestor, John Bowles, was his land agent and was beaten badly in the attack. The whole party was made to swear that they would never return to collect the hated tithes. Rev. Whitley is described as being "rather advanced in years" so this would be Edward Whitty not his son, John, who would have only been in his 20's at that time.

Between 1787 and 1798 he left his son John at Providence Lodge and settled in Rathvilly, co. Carlow. I have him next on record in Rathvilly in 1798 where he put in a damages claim for 175d 6s 9 1/2p for his house which was burned there in the United Irish Rebellion. He died on Mar. 11, 1804 and his funeral service was celebrated at Castletown church, Queen's co. just a few miles from Providence Lodge. Apparently he was buried in Rathvilly Cemetery though, as there is a stone there to his memory erected by his son John."'

Source: Bowles family history online: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bowlesfamily/the_revd_edward_whitty.htm

+++++++

tombstone:
'Sacred to the memory of the Revd Edward Whitty, Archdeacon of Leighlin, and for 40 years Incumbant of Rathvilly. Died March 11 1804 Aged 84 years'

Memorial St Mary’s Church of Ireland Rathvilly

source: from notes of Mary Whitty
 
Whitty Rev. Edward
 
372 Edward was a church leader, landholder and magistrate in the Castletown/Ballickmoyler area of Queen's county from the 1760's to the 1790's. Queen's County is now called County Laois, in the Midlands Region in the province of Leinster.

Edward was involved in the movement in the late 1700s against the payment of tithes: tithes were the source of income for Protestant clergy and much resented by Catholic residents of their parishes. The largely Catholic peasantry strongly objected to being required to pay for the support of a church other than their own, especially when they were forbidden to practice their own religion. There were other grievances as well such as excluding grazing land from the tithe assessment. The larger land owners tended to use their land for grazing, while the peasantry had no choice but to use theirs for subsistence food crops. In 1787, for example, Edward went to seize cattle from a tithe defaulter near the Kilkenny border.

"This morning the Rev. Archdeacon Whitley, who resides about 5 miles from this town [Carlow] in the Queen?s county, accompanied by 8 of his tenants, went on foot to a distant part of his parish, situated in the mountainous part of the county on the confines of the county of Kilkenny, in order to see a decree executed for the tithe long due and of some importance. Three of his men had guns, but through the well known humanity of his disposition, he would not allow them to take anything but powder. After they had seized some cattle, and conducted them part of the way, they were attacked by a multitude armed with scythes, hangers, bayonets, pitchforks etc. who knocked down his people, swore they would hang his agent John Bowles, who was of the party, and whom they compelled to swear that he would never intermeddle with tithes there for the future. One of the miscreants came behind the Archdeacon himself, struck him on the head and wounded him with some edged weapon, but providentially without any material ill consequence. Three guns were leveled at once at him, but still all the crowd were not equally wicked ? some swords were held up in his defense even by his enemies, who, notwithstanding encouraged the rest to proceed in swearing the men, and had not the attention of the mob been called off to one of the men whom they imagined dead, and whom they suffered to be borne off, the whole party must have gone through the same swearing. After this exploit the mob retired in triumph, leaving the poor men much abused who fought gallantly in defense of their master, and would not desert him (though they could have effected their own escape by flight), when they found the Archdeacon, who is rather advanced in years, could not keep pace with them."
Hibernian Magazine January 1787

Edward also suffered during the Irish Rebellion of 1798 when his house in Carlow was destroyed: he put in a damages claim for £175 6s 9 1/2p for his house which was burned.

Edward and Mary had at least four children: Irwine, John, Mary and Jane.

source1: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bowlesfamily/WhittyBowles1787.htm
source2: Reasearch notes of Mary Whitty

+++++

His biography is listed in The Clergy of Dublin and Glendalough as born 1720 Dublin, BA Trinity College 1740, MA Trinity College 1743, Canon of Hollywood and Naul (near Dublin) 1753, Canon of Killaban (Leighlin Diocese) 1765, Rector of Rathvilly (Leighlin Diocese) 1765-1804, Prebendary of Tomgraney, Killaloe 1775-77, Archdeacon of Leighlin 1777-1804.

 
Whitty Rev. Edward
 
373 ++++

Rev Irwine Death records:

There is some confusion over age/dates: the grave inscription at Kilrush suggests (improbably) that he died in 1819 aged 99 after 60 years as incumbent. The memorial plaque in the church suggests he died in 1842 aged 88 after 65 years as incumbent as does the notice of his death in the Clare Journal. The last two seem to be both more accurate and more likely.

"To the memory Of The Revd Irwine Whitty Prebeneary of Iniscathry Diocess of Killaloe Incumbent of the Union of
Sixty years Who departed this life on The 1st August 1819 in Ninty Nineth year Of his age."
Gravestone St Senan?s Church of Ireland Kilrush

"THIS MONUMENT HAS BEEN ERECTED BY THE FRIENDS AND PARISHIONERS OF THE LATE REV. IRWINE WHITTY PREBEND OF INNISCATHERY AND INCUMBANT OF THE UNION OF KILRUSH, FOR SIXTY FIVE YEARS. AS A TESTIMONIAL OF THEIR RESPECT FOR HIS MANY VIRTUES AND STERLING WORTH, HAVING ENDEARED HIMSELF TO AL.L. BY HIS KINDNESS AND BENEVOLENCE OF DISPOSITION. AND SINCERELY LAMENTED BY THE POOR
TO WHOM HE ALWAYS PROVIDED A PROMPT AND READY FRIEND
HE DIED AFTER A FAITHFUL DISCHARGE OF HIS MINISTRY.
IN THE 88 YEAR OF HIS AGE, AUGUST THE 4TH 1842
?BUT IN THE WAY OF RIGHTEOUSNESS IS LIFE AND IN
THE PATHWAY THEREOF, THERE IS NO DEATH?
(PROVERBS X11V28).
Memorial in St Senan?s Church of Ireland Kilrush

'8 August 1842
Death: At the Glebe House, Kilrush on Thursday the 4th August the Rev. Irwin Whitty in his 88th year, 65 years incumbent of the Union of Kilrush and formerly Justice of Peace for the County'
The Clare Journal

source: research notes of Mary Whitty

 
Whitty Rev. Irvine
 
374 KILRUSH
From A Topographical Dictionary of Ireland, 1837

"KILRUSH, a sea-port, market and post-town, and a parish, in the barony of MOYARTA, county of CLARE, and province of MUNSTER, 21 miles (S. W.) from Ennis, and 130 ¼ (S. W.) from Dublin; containing 9732 inhabitants, of which number, 3996 are in the town. This town is pleasantly situated on the northern shore of the estuary of the Shannon, about 15 miles from its mouth, and on the creek to which it gives name, and to the convenience of which for export trade it owes its present importance. It is neatly built, and consists of a market-square insersected from east to west by a spacious street, from which smaller streets branch off; the total number of houses, in 1831, was 712, since which time several others have been added. The principal streets are well paved and flagged; and the roads in the vicinity have been greatly improved within the last few years. The manufactures of the town and neighbourhood, chiefly for home consumption, are friezes, flannels, stockings, strong sheetings, and a serviceable kind of narrow linen, called bandle cloth. There are works for refining rock salt for domestic use, a tanyard, a soap manufactory, and a manufactory for nails.

The chief trade is in corn, butter, cattle, pigs, and agricultural produce; and a considerable number of hides are sold in the market. About 20 small hookers belonging to the port are engaged in fishing and dredging for oysters off the coast, in which about 200 persons are employed...

The port is free of dues, except a small charge for keeping the pier in repair. The pier, which is of very solid construction, is protected by a sea wall of great strength, and is very commodious both for commercial and agricultural uses; it affords great facility for landing passengers from the steam-vessels which regularly ply between this place and Limerick. During the bathing season at Kilkee these vessels ply daily, and at other times only on alternate days...

The harbour is about 9 miles below Tarbert; it is frequented by vessels that trade in grain and other commodities: its peculiar advantage arises from its depth of water, which admits the entrance of vessels of the largest size. Ships of war and Indiamen anchor in the roadstead, and there is a tide harbour with piers and quays; also a patent slip for repairs. Hence it is a good asylum harbour for vessels in distress; its proximity to the mouth of the Shannon renders it easy of access and eligible for vessels to put to sea at any time of the tide; and therefore it must be considered the best position for an American packet station...

A coast-guard station, forming part of the district of Miltown-Malbay is established at Kilrush, and a revenue cutter is stationed off the shore. Branches of the National and Agricultural banks have been opened in the town....

...Quarter sessions are held here at Easter and Michaelmas; petty sessions are held every Tuesday; and a court for the manor of Kilrush is held on the first Monday in every month by the seneschal of Crofton Moore Vandeleur, Esq., lord of the manor. A chief constabulary police force is stationed in the town. The court-house, a neat and commodious building, was erected in 1831, on a site given by Mr. Vandeleur; and a small bridewell was built in 1825, and is well adapted to the classification of prisoners.

The parish comprises 4310 statute acres, as assessed to the county rate, exclusively of a large extent of bog; the system of agriculture has latterly been much improved, and tillage very considerably extended; within the last seven years the quantity of wheat grown has increased tenfold. This improvement is chiefly to be attributed to the facility of communication with Limerick, afforded by the steam navigation company; the quantity of agricultural produce which passed through the market, in 1835, including pigs, amounted in value to £50,000. Great quantities of turf are cut and sent chiefly from Poolanishary harbour, on the western shore of the parish, to Limerick and its neighbourhood, by boats manned by three persons, and each boat is calculated to earn about £200 annually in this trade....

...There are also quarries of good building stone and slate; and in several parts of the parish are indications of lead and copper, but no mine of either has been yet explored...

...The glebe-house, built by a gift of £100 and a loan of £600 from the same Board, is a handsome residence near the church; the glebe comprises about 3 acres...."

source: http://www.libraryireland.com/topog/K/Kilrush-Moyarta-Clare.php 
Whitty Rev. Irvine
 
375 Our branch of the Whitty family is descended from Rev John Whitty who was the Rector of Kilmanaheen, and Archdeacon of Kilfenora Cathedral, Co Clare. He was a younger son of Rev Irwine Whitty of Kilrush, Co Clare His brothers were Rev Irwine Whitty of Golden Tipperary, murdered in 1832, and Major Edward Whitty of the 26th Foot, who died in Calcutta in 1835. Their sister, Mary, died unmarried, aged 22, in 1799. They all have gravestones or memorial stones in the (now disused) St Senan?s Church, Kilrush.

Irwine was a priest and a Justice of the Peace in Co. Clare, Ireland.

He entered Trinity College Dublin in 1768 and was awarded his BA in 1773. He was Deacon of Cork in 1775, Chaplain to the 46th Foot 1775 - 86, Prebendary of Inniscattery, Killaloe Co Clare 1777- 1842 and Rector of Kilrush, Co Clare 1777 - 1842 and a JP. As a magistrate Irwine was active in dealing with the insurrection of 1798.

'1798. In the winter of this year, after the rebellion had been suppressed in all other parts of Ireland, it
broke out here; but the insurgents were utterly discomfited by the active exertions of the Kilrush
yeomanry, the officers and seamen of his Majesty's gunboats, and some strong detachments of
dragoons. On this trying occasion, the value of a resident Protestant clergyman, discharging the arduous
and unpopular office of a justice of the peace, appeared in a striking point of view.'
from Mason's Parochial Survey

County Clare was always a source of British government concern over the threat of French invasion and insurrection in the late 18th and early 19th century because of its relatively remote location on the west coast of Ireland and the comparative poverty of its Catholic population. Kilrush was a focus of this concern because of its position on the north shore of the Shannon river and its Atlantic harbour.

Irwine, together with his three sons Edward, John and Irwine, and many other Protestant gentry in Co Clare, supported the proposed union of Ireland and Great Britain in a public declaration reported in the Ennis Chronicle of 1 September 1799. The Act of Union was passed in August 1800 and came into effect on 1 January 1801. It was passed largely in response to the 1798 rebellion and was underpinned by the perception that the rebellion was provoked as much by the misrule of a Protestant governing class as the efforts of the United Irishmen.

source: research notes of Mary Whitty
 
Whitty Rev. Irvine
 
376 Educated Clifton College, became a Solicitor in Surrey, one son.
 
Whitty Ronald Henry Tarlton
 
377 a grocer of Dublin and Exeter. Another source says that he was the son of a Rev. John Whitty who was the son of Sir Walter Whitty of Ballyteigue Castle in the Parish of Kilmore in co. Wexford

source: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bowlesfamily/the_revd_edward_whitty.htm 
Whitty Thomas
 
378 In Memory of Catherine Whitty, died 12th January 1892 aged 93; and her husband Thos Ravenscroft Whitty, died 4 March 1862 aged 86; Also their children Major John Whitty, Died 28 March 1877 aged 46; Staff Surgeon Thos R. Whitty, Died 8 June 1868 aged 34; Major W Nassau Whitty, Died Feby 1882 aged 46; Annie C. Rawson, Died 16 April 1885, aged 46; Irwine Whitty in Australia 1907, aged 74
Memorial St Mary’s Church of Ireland Rathvilly

source: research notes of Mary Whitty 
Whitty Thomas Ravenscroft
 
379 They had 6 children Whitty Thomas Ravenscroft
 
380 Rector of Wood Norton, Norfolk 1750 - 1758 Whitwell Rev Edward
 
381 We don't know anything about Mercy's family in Chard, Somerset, but her village was about 3 miles away from her future husband John's home village of Buckland St Mary. She is supposed to have been omne of his music pupils, even though she was only a couple of years younger, which shows both that her family must have been able to afford music lessons and also that she was musical herself. After they married she bore 8 children to her music teacher husband, and they lived in Pople's Well in Crewkerne, which is a set of cottages in a dip below the school where he taught, on the edge of town.

After John died in 1863 Mercy moved to London, and showed both determination and some financial stability in setting up a small school. It was on the same road in Ealing where her son Julius was the Vicar, and had 10 students and 4 staff a couple of years before she died.

++++++

The marriage in 1831, Chard, comes from someone elses family tree, no primary source seen to prove it. Chard had 3 independent chapels then, so no C of E church

1841 Census:
The Summerhayes family are living in Popes Well, Crekerne.
John Summerhayes is head, aged 30, a 'professor of music'
Mercy is also aged 30. Children;
Julius aged 9
Thomas aged 7
William aged 6
Mercy Eliza aged 3
John aged 1

1851 Census:
John Summerhayes, age 42, Professor of Music (born Buckland St Mary) lives at Popes Well in Crewkerne, with his wife Mary [sic] age 41 (born Chaffcombe?). Children;
Thomas age 17, occupation Sailor
William age 15
Mercy Eliza age 12
John Henry age 10
Virtue wilkins a visitor aged 33

1861 Census:
John Summerhayes, age 52, Professor of Music (born Buckland St Mary) lives at Popes Well in Crewkerne, with his wife Mary [sic] age 50 (born Chaffcombe?). Children;
Mary E age 22
John age 20, student
Henry age 18, medical student
Virtue Wilkins, sister-in-law, landowner
Harriet Lombard, age 27, house servant

1881 Census:
Mercy Summerhayes is head of a household in Mattock Lane, Percival Place, Ealing. She's an Annuitant widow age 69, born in Chard, Somerset.
With her lives Mercy Summerhayes her daughter, unmarried, age 42 and a schoolmistress born in Crewkerne.
Also there are a French governess, 3 scholars age 12-16, a cook and a housemaid.
So Mercy seems to be running a small school.

* Mattock Lane is right beside St Johns church in Ealing, where her son is the vicar in the 1881 Census, so the family are together.

1891 Census:
Mercy Summerhayes is head of the household as a widow, 'living on own means' in No 7 Mattock Lane, Ealing, age 81, born Chard in Somerset.
Also there is Mary Eliza, age 52, schoolmistress. Its a very large household with a total of 17 people, and looks like a school. There are 2 governesses in their 20s - one a teacher of English, one of French - and 10 students from age 10 to 17, including 'granddaughter Minnie(something?) Summerhayes age 15. There are also 3 domestic servants.

++++++++++

Record of death 1893 Jan-Mar:
Mercy Summerhayes, Brentford, age 83

Death notice in the Argus, Melbourne, Australia (Friday Apr 14th 1893):
'SUMMERHAYES.?On the 15th February, at Beresford-house, Ealing, Middlesex, Mercy, widow of John Summerhayes, of Crewkerne, aged 83 years. Deeply loved by all who knew her.'
 
Wilkin Mercy
 
382 They have two daughters, Pia and Mus Willert Mette
 
383 1790 Marriage Bann record:
Thomas Sheppard aged 21, to Ann Williams, aged 21
At St Lukes Parish, Chelsea

 
Williams Ann
 
384 There are various Ann Williams who are baptised in 1769 in London so can't take her line further back without a marriage certificate linking her to Thomas Sheppard which states parents  Williams Ann
 
385 of Hollin Hall, Yorks. Wood Charles
 
386 There is a Baptism record for Harry 1st March 1835, at St Benedicts in Norwich.
Father Phillip woodgate, Manufacturer, Mother Harriet.
Parents names and occupation correct, so perhaps this was a Harry who died as a child?

1841 Census:
The Woodgate family live in St Stephens parish, Norwich.
Grandfather Phillip Woodgate is ahead of the hosue aged 65, a merchant, his wife Maria is aged 70
[young] Phillip Woodgate is aged 35, and also a Merchant
Harrietta his wife is aged 35
grandson Phillip is aged 10
Grand-daughter Maria aged 3
Grandson Harry aged 1

1851 Census:
The Woodgate family live at No 5 St Giles Rd, Norwich.
Phillip Woodgate is the head, agd 49, a Manhouseman (?), born in Norwich
Harrietta his wife is aged 48, also from Norwich
son Phillip is aged 21, and a Commercial travellor
Maria is aged 14
Henry / Harry is aged 9
and there are 2 domestic servants 
Woodgate Harry
 
387 Maria was born and brought up in Norwich, the daughter of a trader. She married Julius who was a clergyman and moved to live in Ealing London where she brought up three children. She died at the home of her second son in Limpsfield, Surrey.

++++++

Baptism record 1836:
Maria, father Phillip woodgate, Manufacturer, mother Harriett was baptised at St Benedict in Norwich on 20th Nov 1836.

source: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~tinstaafl/Church_Pages/norwich_st_benedict.htm

+++++++

1841 Census:
The Woodgate family live in St Stephens parish, Norwich.
Grandfather Phillip Woodgate is ahead of the hosue aged 65, a merchant, his wife Maria is aged 70
[young] Phillip Woodgate is aged 35, and also a Merchant
Harrietta his wife is aged 35
grandson Phillip is aged 10
Grand-daughter Maria aged 3
Grandson Harry aged 1

1851 Census:
The Woodgate family live at No 5 St Giles Rd, Norwich.
Phillip Woodgate is the head, agd 49, a Manhouseman (?), born in Norwich
Harrietta his wife is aged 48, also from Norwich
son Phillip is aged 21, and a Commercial travellor
Maria is aged 14
Henry / Harry is aged 9
and there are 2 domestic servants

1871 Census:
John[sic] Summerhayes is the head of the family, age 38(?), born Crewkerne in Somerset, 'Curate in charge of St Johns'.
His wife Maria age 33, born Norwich, is there also with son Henry age 8, daughter Mary age 6, along with 6 pupils age 12 to 16. Three domestic servants also live there.

1881 Census:
Summerhayes family is living in St John's Vicarage
Julius is the head, aged 49, Vicar of St Johns, birthplace Crewkerne
Maria his wife is aged 44, born in Norwich
Mary his daughter aged 16 is a scholar, born in Ealing
Julius J his son is aged 9, born in Ealing
and they have a cook and housemaid living with them

1891 Census:
Summerhayes family is living in St John's Vicarage
Julius is the head, aged 59, Vicar of St Johns, birthplace Crewkerne
Maria his wife is aged 54, born in Norwich
Harry Woodgate, brother-in-law is staying, he's a clerk aged 49, born in Norwich.
John O summerhayes, a nephew is staying, student of medecine, and there are two domestic servants

1911 Census
Maria Summerhayes, age 73, widow, born norwich in Norfolk is living with her daughter-in-law Emily Geraldine Summerhayes, age 36, (British subject, born Dusseldorf, Germany) in St Johns Vicarage, Ealing, London, along with 2 domestice servants.
Maria's son RevJulius wasn't at home on day of census, obviously.

+++++++

record of Probate 1922:

SUMMERHAYES Maria of St John's Vicarage Ealing, Dean ealing, Middlesex, widow, died 18th Feb 1922 at St Michaels, Limpsfield, Surrey. Probate London 28th March to the rev Henry Summerhayes, and the reverend Julius James Summerhayes, clerks. Effects £1124. 
Woodgate Maria
 
388 Marriage record 1799:
Philip Woodgate married Maria Culley
At Witton, by North Walsham Norfolk

++++++++++

Phillip Woodgate, Woolcomber, Magdalen street, Norwich, sat on the Committee of Woolcombers.
This was "Appointed by Act of Parliament for 'More effectually preventing abuses & Frauds committed by persons employed in the Manufactories of Combing wool and worsted yarn,' in Norfolk and Norwich."
source: "A Concise History and Directory of the City of Norwich for 1811"

1830 mentioned in the Law Advertiser vol 8, p.379:
'INSOLVENY DECLARATIONS
Assignments for benefit of Creditors
11 Aug 1830 LASSCOCK William, Downham Market, Norfolk, Draper. Trustees: Henry Saffery of Downham Market, Grocer and Draper, and Philip Woodgate of Norwich, Draper.'

Also mentioned in same book with his son:
1830 Law Advertiser vol 8, p.420:
'BANKRUPTS
Town and Country Commissions
Gazette Tues Nov 2
BURNE Thomas, Joseph smith and Philip Woodgate, the younger, of Watling street in the city of London, Warehousemen. To surrender Nov 12 at 10, Nov 16 at 12, and Dec 14 at 11. Sol. W Fisher, Walbrooke. Pet. Cred. Philip Woodgate, Sen. Norwich, warehouseman.'

source: http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=AuMuAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA420&lpg=PA420&dq=phillip+woodgate+norwich+manufacturer&source=bl&ots=OonW9lPpA2&sig=_U4y_HiVKDJH44weCM_ayzhPTgc&hl=en&sa=X&ei=JpwTUfzUHaO60QXtnIC4DA&sqi=2&ved=0CEMQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=phillip%20woodgate%20norwich%20manufacturer&f=false

++++++++++

1836 'History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Norfolk, and the City and County of the City of Norwich', p.203:
MANUFACTURERS (SILK & WORSTED)
Woodgate Phillip, Livingstone's ct, Market pl.; h.14 crescent
Woodgate Pp. jun, Bethel st.

source: http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=UUMJAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA203&lpg=PA203&dq=phillip+woodgate+norwich+manufacturer&source=bl&ots=ARe4_LsPD5&sig=yqOWChHbzdIHKTVfieXjgDzxZFc&hl=en&sa=X&ei=LqYTUeKLF8bL0AX7goCIDQ&ved=0CFgQ6AEwBzgK#v=onepage&q=phillip%20woodgate%20norwich%20manufacturer&f=false

++++++


1841 Census:
The Woodgate family live in St Stephens parish, Norwich.
Grandfather Phillip Woodgate is ahead of the house aged 65, a merchant, his wife Maria is aged 70
[young] Phillip Woodgate is aged 35, and also a Merchant
Harrietta his wife is aged 35
grandson Phillip is aged 10
Grand-daughter Maria aged 3
Grandson Harry aged 1

+++++++++
Excerpts from a 'Concise History and Directory of the City of Norwich for 1811' Containing besides the Lists, a variety of LOCAL INFORMATION, useful and interesting To RESIDENTS and STRANGERS.
by C. Berry

"Norwich, in its present state, is said to p. 2occupy more ground, comparatively with its population, than any city in the kingdom, being much interspersed with gardens, and it is frequently stiled, a city in an orchard; its shape is irregular, and may not unaptly be compared to a shoulder of mutton?it is full one mile and a half in length, and a mile and quarter broad. It contains thirty four churches and a number of chapels and meeting houses, besides the cathedral; it has five bridges over the river; it was formerly nearly surrounded with a wall, planted with forty two towers and had twelve gates, the former is dilapidated the latter, within a few years have been taken down.

...At what period the art of manufacturing cloth from wool was first introduced in this Island, is not certain; but it may be supposed it was early practised in Norfolk, from the circumstance of spinning with the distaff, being still retained here...The author of the Tour through the Island of Great Britain, in 1724, gives a statement which was furnished by a manufacturer, whereby p. 12it appears 120,000 persons were employed in the various branches of the Norwich manufactory...At present, the merchants being shut out of foreign markets by war, and from our own by fashion, the number of hands employed must be considerably reduced. The principal articles of this manufactory, are bombazines and broad camblets, for the latter, of which the East India Company, have annually given large orders.
...The staple manufactory of Norwich, furnishes about fifty distinct occupations from the shearer of the sheep to the mariner who ships the goods. The earnings of the different artizens are various?men from 6s. to 30s. per week; women from 5s. to 15s. and children, by spinning, filling and tire drawing, from 1s. to 4s. The combing of wool used to employ a great number of hands; but since the invention of machines, their employ is in a great measure superseded.

...A gentleman desirous of spending a few days in Norwich, cannot help being gratified by seeing the various employments of its extensive manufactories in Stuffs, Cottons, Shawls &c.?the first and last of which are here carried to a perfection no where else to be met with in England.

Norwich adds greatly to the trade of Yarmouth, by the importation of about 40,000 p. 45chaldrons of coals yearly; wine, fish, oil, Irish yarn, and all heavy goods which come from thence by the river Yare: and in Peace the exportation of its manufactures to Russia, Germany, Holland, Denmark, Norway, Spain, Portugal, Italy, &c. The keels and wherries which navigate between Norwich and Yarmouth are acknowledged to be superior to any other small craft in England, for carrying a larger burthen, and being worked at a smaller expence.

...Norwich has experienced of late years, a number of improvements; the lighting is much more brilliant, and better regulated than formerly; the paving also, which is in great forwardness, and the alterations consequent thereon, have already much improved many parts, and will when finished, add greatly to the beauty of the city, and to the convenience and comfort of the inhabitants and occasional visitors."

there is a great deal more detail about the city from the transcript of the book here:
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/32829/32829-h/32829-h.htm



 
Woodgate Philip, sen.
 
389 Phillip/Philip is variously described in sources as a Warehouseman in London and Norwich (warehousemen were involved in wholesale of textiles in Norwich), a merchant, and a shoe manufacturer. He probably went bankrupt early in his career which he must have recovered from, he married twice, and was basically involved in trade all his life between Norwich and London.

He married Harrietta when they were both about 25, and they had three children together. After Harrietta died he moved to London where he married a second time aged 68 to a spinster boarder who was staying in his house, Frances aged 48. He died shortly after.

++++++

4th July 1826 Marriage record
Harriett Rudrum marries Philip Woodgate at St. Stephen's, Norwich.

+++++++

1828, 2 records one below the other in London Gazette:

'NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore
subsisting between Philip Woodgate the elder, John Prescott Oxley, and Philip Woodgate the younger, of the City of Norwich, Mauchester- Warehousemen, and carried on under the firm of Woodgate, Oxley, and Woodgate, was on the 24th day of June 1827, dissolved by mutual consent.
? Dated this 30th day of April 1828.
P. Woodgate.
John P. Oxley.
Philip Woodgate, jun.'

source: http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/18466/pages/847/page.pdf

++++++++

1830 mentioned in the Law Adverstiser vol 8, p.420:
'BANKRUPTS
Town and Country Commissions
Gazette Tues Nov 2
BURNE Thomas, Joseph smith and Philip Woodgate, the younger, of Watling street in the city of London, Warehousemen. To surrender Nov 12 at 10, Nov 16 at 12, and Dec 14 at 11. Sol. W Fisher, Walbrooke. Pet. Cred. Philip Woodgate, Sen. Norwich, warehouseman.'

source: http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=AuMuAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA420&lpg=PA420&dq=phillip+woodgate+norwich+manufacturer&source=bl&ots=OonW9lPpA2&sig=_U4y_HiVKDJH44weCM_ayzhPTgc&hl=en&sa=X&ei=JpwTUfzUHaO60QXtnIC4DA&sqi=2&ved=0CEMQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=phillip%20woodgate%20norwich%20manufacturer&f=false

+++++++

1836 'History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Norfolk, and the City and County of the City of Norwich', p.203:
MANUFACTURERS (SILK & WORSTED)
Woodgate Phillip, Livingstone's ct, Market pl.; h.14 crescent
Woodgate Pp. jun, Bethel st.

source: http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=UUMJAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA203&lpg=PA203&dq=phillip+woodgate+norwich+manufacturer&source=bl&ots=ARe4_LsPD5&sig=yqOWChHbzdIHKTVfieXjgDzxZFc&hl=en&sa=X&ei=LqYTUeKLF8bL0AX7goCIDQ&ved=0CFgQ6AEwBzgK#v=onepage&q=phillip%20woodgate%20norwich%20manufacturer&f=false

'WAREHOUSEMEN As trade increased master weavers became owners of warehouses, the place where cloth could be kept and buyers from other parts could come to inspect and hopefully purchase what was on offer. If a period of court mourning was declared buyers from London visited these warehouses and at times cleared the stocks of the many black mourning cloths produced.'

source: trades of the textile business in Norwich
http://www.norwichtextiles.org.uk/info/research-resources/glossaries

++++

1841 Census:
The Woodgate family live in St Stephens parish, Norwich.
Grandfather Phillip Woodgate is ahead of the hosue aged 65, a merchant, his wife Maria is aged 70
[young] Phillip Woodgate is aged 35, and also a Merchant
Harrietta his wife is aged 35
grandson Phillip is aged 10
Grand-daughter Maria aged 3
Grandson Harry aged 1

1851 Census:
The Woodgate family live at No 5 St Giles Rd, Norwich.
Phillip Woodgate is the head, agd 49, a Warehouseman, born in Norwich
Harrietta his wife is aged 48, also from Norwich
son Phillip is aged 21, and a Commercial travellor
Maria is aged 14
Henry / Harry is aged 9
and there are 2 domestic servants

1861 Census:
Phillip Woodgate and family live in the Heigham parish of Norwich at a ladies school.
Phillip is age 59 and a 'Shoe Manufacturer', born Norwich.
Harriet his wife is age 58, also born Norwich
Son Henry, age 19, is a warehouse assistant, born Norwich.
They also have a domestic servant living with them.
*Francis M Ladbrooke aged 38 is a visitor at the same address. 10 years later she is living as a boarder with Phillip in London, after his wife died, and they then got married.

1871 Census:
Phillip Woodgate lives in 167 Asylum Rd, Camberwell, London. He is aged 68, a 'retired Wholesale Warehouseman', born Norwich.
Living with him is his son Harry, a Clerk Accountant age 28, and a 48 yr old annuitant boarder called Frances Ladbrooke.

Phillip married the boarder staying at his house in 1871.

1st Aug 1871 Marriage record:
St Marks, Shoreditch, London, Phillip Woodgate age 68, widower marries Frances Maria Ladbrooke, age 48, spinster.
His profession is 'Merchant', hers unrecorded.
Residence for both at time of marriage, Camberwell.
His father is Phillip Woodgate, Merchant
Her father is Robert Ladbrooke, Carter

+++++++

probable record of death 1872, Apr-Jun:
WOODGATE Philip, age 70, Camberwell
 
Woodgate Philip, jun.
 
390 1841 Census:
The Woodgate family live in St Stephens parish, Norwich.
Grandfather Phillip Woodgate is ahead of the hosue aged 65, a merchant, his wife Maria is aged 70

[young] Phillip Woodgate is aged 35, and also a Merchant
Harrietta his wife is aged 35
grandson Phillip is aged 10
Grand-daughter Maria aged 3
Grandson Harry aged 1 
Woodgate Phillip
 
391 1851 Census:
The Woodgate family live at No 5 St Giles Rd, Norwich.
Phillip Woodgate is the head, agd 49, a Manhouseman (?), born in Norwich
Harrietta his wife is aged 48, also from Norwich
son Phillip is aged 21, and a Commercial travellor
Maria is aged 14
Henry / Harry is aged 9
and there are 2 domestic servants 
Woodgate Phillip
 
392 His wife, Elizabeth Wyncoll bore 7 children and must have had to put up with quite a lot of bother, seeing as she was married to a ‘controvertialist’. Wyncoll Elizabeth
 
393 of Bures, Essex Wyncoll Isaac
 

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