Notes


Matches 101 to 150 of 393

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101 Gunnery officer in WW1, wounded as were two other brothers, died after the war in a climbing accident. Ellison William
 
102 Was a curate at Mary's father's church in Ealing, went on to be a chaplain in India for 20 years. They had 6 boys and 2 girls.  Ellison William
 
103 of Stamford Farrer Elizabeth
 
104 of Warmington Farrer Rev Thomas
 
105 High Sheriff of County Westmeath in 1781 Featherstonehaugh Cuthbert
 
106 from Mosstown, Co. Westmeath Featherstonehaugh Lydia
 
107 source: http://henly.familytreeguide.com/getperson.php?personID=I58600&tree=Allfamilies Ferris Sarah
 
108 Eliza is a Londoner who was born into comfortable circumstances (her father being a gentleman), who lived for a time in Yorkshire while growing up. She married James who became a successful solicitor, and lived the rest of her life in north and south London. She gave birth to 9 children, and reached the age of 91, seeing through the whole Victorian period.

From family notes of Mcdonald Beaumont 1934:

"...Your great-grandmother, a Miss King, married Fisher at the early age of 16, a jolly-looking girl, I fancy. They both [i.e. Mrs Fisher and her daughter Eliza Charlotte] lived in Yorkshire for a time, near the Moors and to the authress of 'Jane Eyre', who was so isolated that your grand-mother (Eliza Charlotte) could not concieve how she acquired her knowledge of the world.

Strictly we are entitled to hyphen Fisher to Beaumont, as your grandmother was the last of her race, but we have never done it, and Fisher is not a pretty name. She did have one brother who went the pace and whose death was very sudden indeed, so we did not discuss him much."

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Birth Record 1817:
Eliza Charlotte, daughter of William and Elizabeth Fisher
Abode, Vauxhall Walk. william occupation is 'Gentleman'.
Baptised 12th Feb 1817 at St Mary's Lambeth.

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1841 Marriage record:
10th June James Beaumont and Eliza Charlott Fisher are married at St Michael, Highgate. Both fathers are present; John Beaumont, gentleman, and William Fisher, solicitor

1861 census:
Beaumont family live at The Grove, Highgate (which seems to be divided between different large families).
James Beaumont is head of the family aged 52, a solicitor, born in Hackney.
Eliza Charlotte his wife is aged 44, born in Vauxhall.
son William is 19, an articled clerk to a solicitor, born in Highgate
Mary Ann, daughter aged 17, also born in Highgate
Constance, daughter aged 14, born Highgate
Fanny aged 12, daughter, born Highgate
Ellen, 11, daughter, born Highgate
Emma Kate, aged 9, born in Brighton
Charles George, aged 6, born in Brighton
MacDonald, aged 3, born in Brighton
And they have 4 servants living with them

The Grove is a street in Highgate has big houses on it, the poet Samual Taylor Coleridge lived there 1816-34, J B Priestley lived there. It's now very high class, with Kate Moss, Sting, Annie Lennox and George Michael living there.

1871 Census:
the family live at No1. Blessington st. in the parish of Lee, Lewisham.
James Baumont, head, agd 62, solicitor
Eliza C, his wife aged 54
Edward, son, aged 26, a Barrister
Constance, daughter aged 24
Fanny, daughter aged 22
Ellen, daughter agd 21
Emma, daughter aged 19
and three servants.

1891 Census:
E C Beaumont is a widow and head of household at No.1 Blssington Rd, in the Pairsh of Lee, Lewisham. She is 'surviving on own means'.
Daughters EJ aged 41 + EK aged 39 live in the house, as do two servants.

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Probate 1908:
Beaumont Eliza Charlotte of Arundel House, Blessington rd, Lee, Kent, widow died 10th Apr 1908...effects £18,282 
Fisher Eliza Charlotte
 
109 recorded as a Solicitor at the wedding of his daughter.

"Your great grandfather Fisher was a partner in the firm of Torr Janeway & C. (now, I think, Torr & Co.) of Bedford Row. Your great uncle Shepeard was senior, and many sons junior, partners in Shepeards (solicitors) of Finsbury and Kensington.
Great Uncle Waller was rather a shining light as a doctor - killed by the fall of a Roman candle at a children's firework party, causing a carbuncle. Three sons followed his profession; one brilliant died of morphia and brandy; another, cleverer, and nicer, from champagne and brandy - one certainly, and both probably, had great pain. the third, mediocre, died naturally.

I know not what great-uncle Madgewick was, but his widow was a dear, as all J.B's sisters were. Some were like aunts Ellen and Emma, others more like Aunt Fanny Souper, with a dash of go. All had biblical names - Rebecca, susan, Sarah, Sophia, Judith and Elisa."

source: notes of Kenneth Beaumont 1934

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Marriage Record 1811:
William Fisher of St Mary Lambeth and Elizabeth King of this Parish, were married in this church this 15th December. st George Church, Hanover Square, Westminster

Daughter Birth Record 1817:
Eliza Charlotte, daughter of William and Elizabeth Fisher
Abode, Vauxhall Walk. william occupation is 'Gentleman'.
Baptised 12th Feb 1817 at St Mary's Lambeth.

Death record 1846:
6th Jan 1846 William Fisher, of Brighton Terrace, Brixton, was buried aged 55, at St Mary's Newington in Southwark.
 
Fisher William
 
110 Almondbury is on the edge of Huddersfield.

'Almondbury is one of the oldest and prettiest of the villages dominating the edge of the Pennine moors. Many of these old villages have long been absorbed by the expansion of the town of Huddersfield but some of the houses, many with old mullioned windows behind which the cloth that gained the area its early reputation as a fine centre for wool worsted was woven, can still be seen.

Historically the first market held at Almondbury was in the 13th century when cloth was traded in the churchyard with the merchants using gravestones for tables. Huddersfield market did not develop until 1672, and later in the 19th century mills grew up along the river. Almondbury is also known for Castle Hill, said to have Roman connections.'
source: http://www.picturesofengland.com/England/West_Yorkshire/Almondbury

 
Frith Anne
 
111 Margaret was born in the North East Highlands of Scotland at the end of a century which had seen Jacobite rebellions and repressive English occupation. By the time she was born however the British army had many Highland regiments and from her tiny rural village she lived for a time in Dundee - one of the fast expanding cities of a global power.

She married a local man aged 25 or so, and went on to have at least 3 children as she followed her husband to Dundee and then Inverness.
She lived well into her 70s and died while living as a widow, with her son in Tain.

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Marriage record 1820, Urray Parish:
Alexander MacRae and Margaret Gollan, both in Urray, were matrimonially contracted the 15th and Married the 30th Jan 1820. (Their eldest son William was born in December 1820 so that fits)

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1841 census:
Alexander MacRae lives in Dundee, Aged 45, living with his wife Margaret also aged 45 in Gellatley st. His profession is as a 'Sawyer' (rather than Lawyer when you compare the handwriting with the rest of the document), and they have two daughters living with them Mary aged 15 and Ann aged 12.

1851 census:
Alexander MacRae aged 54 (born Urray Rosshire)is living with his wife Margaret aged 52 (born Urray Rosshire)in No.5 Bogroy, in the Kirkhill area of Inverness.
Alexander is a "merchant grocer" [which chimes with the 'merchant' that Margaret has on her death certificate later] and living with them is daughter Ann aged 22 who is a 'house servant' (born Urray, Rosshire), and granddaughter Margaret aged 4 (born Dundee).

1871 census (this might be her but not guaranteed)
Margaret MacRae, Merchant's Widow, aged 74, born Urray, lives with the Grant family in the Parish of Contin.
*What doesn't quite add up is she described as the mother in law of the head of the family, Evan Grant. Evan Grant's wife is Margaret Grant aged 43. If this IS the correct record, then daughter Margaret must be the eldest daughter (a year older than Anne) who would have been aged 16 during the 1841 census - when we have no record of her - and so already away working somewhere else, hence we have never heard of her before.
On the plus side of probability, it seems highly unlikely that there was more that one Margaret MacRae, merchant's widow, with the right name and age born in the small parish of Urray.

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Death record 1874:
Margaret McRae, widow of Alexander McRae, Merchant, died 19th June at 6:30pm. She lived in Hartfield street Tain [which is where William MacRae, her son, was living with his family in 1871 and 1881] and her son William MacRae was present. She was 79 years old. She died of 'natural decay' and no request was made for a medical attendant.
Her Father was recorded as William Gollan, Cooper, Mother not known. 
Gollan Margaret
 
112 We know of Margaret from a family history:
'The Gordons and Smiths at Minmore, Auchorachan, and Upper Drumin in Glenlivet' by John Malcolm Bulloch
Published 1910. Margaret is mentioned on the family tree on p.52
source: https://archive.org/stream/gordonssmithsatm00bull#page/52/mode/2up


"This family was founded by Andrew Smith, farmer, Upper Drumin, who married in 1776 Margaret Gordon. Auchorachan, daughter of William Gordon of Bogfoutain... Andrew Smith and his wife had five sons and two daughters." 
Gordon Margaret
 
113 Indian civil Service Grant Charles W
 
114 Also called Christian Grant Christina
 
115 We know about Christina from a family history book: 'The Gordons and Smiths at Minmore, Auchorachan, and Upper Drumin in Glenlivet' by John Malcolm Bulloch
Published 1910.
Christina is mentioned on the family tree on p.52
source: https://archive.org/stream/gordonssmithsatm00bull#page/52/mode/2up

"William Smith, born 1777 : married in 1806 Christina Grant, daughter of John Grant of Mid-Bellandie, afterwards
of Lynbeg, a small farm, and Isobel Macdonald. Her brother, Captain William Grant, 92nd Gordon Highlanders,
fought at Waterloo. She was a first cousin of Mrs George Smith of Minmore." 
Grant Christina
 
116 described as a Writer, and from 'New North Berk'(?) parish in marriage record Grant George
 
117 We only know about Helen through a family history book: 'The Gordons and Smiths at Minmore, Auchorachan, and Upper Drumin in Glenlivet' by John Malcolm Bulloch
Published 1910. Andrew is mentioned on the family tree on p.52
source: https://archive.org/stream/gordonssmithsatm00bull#page/52/mode/2up


The following is a footnote on the family origins which mentions Helen, from p.52 of the book above:

"My cousin, Colonel John Gordon Smith of Minmore, told me about a year before his death that he traced the Smiths back to an armourer who lived about the middle of the 14th cenntury. Owing to his occupation, the family came to be called "Gow" though their real name was Macintosh or Macpherson, more probably the former. He added that their crest had always been the same as the well-known Macintosh and Macpherson crest: a cat rampant, and the motto, "Touch not the cat but the glove." Later the Gow was anglicised into Smith.

They owned land in Glenrinnes, which they lost through neglecting to perform some obligation ('probably feudal) connected with its tenure. After this, being less prosperous, Andrew Smith and his brother went down to Glenlivet and took the farms of Corshellachie and Mullochard.

The name of Andrew Smith's wife appears to have been Helen Grant, as the following extract from the Parish Register almost certainly refers to them - "13th May 1737, Margaret, daughter of Andrew Smith and Helen Grant, Corshellachie, baptised." His son Andrew was born at Corshellachie on 31st May 1742, but the date on which the latter moved to Upper Drumin is not recorded. I. G. R."

 
Grant Helen
 
118 source: http://histfam.familysearch.org/getperson.php?personID=I94676&tree=Fasti
 
Grant Isabella
 
119 We know about John from a family history book: 'The Gordons and Smiths at Minmore, Auchorachan, and Upper Drumin in Glenlivet' by John Malcolm Bulloch
Published 1910.
John is mentioned on the family tree on p.52
source: https://archive.org/stream/gordonssmithsatm00bull#page/52/mode/2up

"William Smith, born 1777 : married in 1806 Christina Grant, daughter of John Grant of Mid-Bellandie, afterwards
of Lynbeg, a small farm, and Isobel Macdonald. Her brother, Captain William Grant, 92nd Gordon Highlanders,
fought at Waterloo. She was a first cousin of Mrs George Smith of Minmore." 
Grant John
 
120 George grew up the eldest son of the minister on the Isle of Eigg in the western islands. He grew up sailing and fishing, and then left the highlands to be an army doctor in India, rising to be Brigade Surgeon Lieutenant in the Indian Medical Service. His interest in India may well have started due to the McPherson family which owned the island having many cousins from India who would come and holiday on the island.
He retained his love of the highlands, after retiring back to live in London, and seems to have kept a house on Eigg.

Obituary in the Celtic Monthly, Feb 1912:

'Colonel Grant was a strong man, physically and morally; a man of high principle, reliable in all his undertakings; and though unnassuming was posessed of a quiet dignity that made it impossible to ever take a liberty with him. At times his natural seriousness made him seem a little sombre, but he had a ready appreciation of humour, and keenly enjoyed a good story or a bit of dry, scotch wit...

No record of colonel Grant, however slight, could pass over his love of sailing. Though loyally interested in all that pertained to his native part of Scotland where his forebears had lived fro generations [Speyside, Banffshire], it was invariably to the West Coast that he turned for rest and recreation when from time to time he came back from India on furlough. He was a born sailor, and aided by the skill and daring of his brother, who equally with himslef had a lifelong enthusiasm for the sea, he delighted ion cruising among the islands he knew so well.

On these occassions a small yatch would be hired for a couple of months, and two reliable islanders engaged to work her under the critical eye of the brothers, who were past masters in the art of sailing such craft. More than once it was an old schooner - rigged 14 tonner that carried them safely over their adventurous voyage, which usually included going round the Mull of Kintyre and crossing the Minch to the Outer Hebrides...

when Colonel Grant retired from the service his cruise became an annual thing, and he soon possessed an excellent little 20 tonne cutter of his own. He lived in England but his yatch was never taken there. He was such a devoted Scot that he would have found no delight in yatching in English waters. the "Aleina" was kept safely anchored in the Holy Loch during the winter, and from the Clyde they always started on their northern cruise, neither brother ever dreaming of slipping the yatch comfortably through the Crinan canal and avoiding the formidable Mull.

Many a fearful battering did they get off that famous headland, many a storm did they encounter among the islands, many a treacherous squall fell upon them from the peaks of Rum or the Cuchullins; but these grand struggles with wind and wave were just what colonel Grant and his brother loved, and however rough and critical their experiences might be, the following summer found them both equally eager to set out again for their wild Archipelago.

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The Grant family get mentioned in a history of the island called 'Eigg - the story of an island' in the following passages.

"Fishing on Eigg was lagging far behind Muck where the new owner, Captain Swinburne had established a salt depot and equipped the islanders with smacks capable of fishing Rockall, but it was catching up, especially since the arrival of Rev Grant and his son to the parish in 1848. Grant added to his income by catching basking sharks, and island tradition recalls how in the summer months the minister's smack would often be seen to divert it's course in pursuit of a shark whilst on its way to a church service in the other islands! George Grant the minister's eldest son, who had retired to Eigg from the Indian Medical Service, was now employing a crew of islanders to catch herring and gurnard on long lines. Fish were so plentiful that in one afternoon George Grant and two others managed to catch 494 gurnards with only 3 hooks!...

...The Edgeworth diaries made much of the polite social intercourse between the MacPhersons and their tenant farmers: The MacLeans in Kiell, as Kildonan was then called, the Stewarts at Laig, the minister and his family. The schoolmaster and the priest were also guests at Neag na Feannaig where 'reeling in the parlour' provided an agreeable distraction from reading novels and studying botany, when the young Grants occasionally dropped in with a fiddler...

source: P.88-89 'Eigg the story of an island' by Camille Dressler, 1998, Polygon, Edinburgh.

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1891 Census:
George Grant, age 56, retired army Surgeon, born Scotland, lives with his wife Amy F Grant age 37, born East Indies at Fairfield, Alleyn Park in Camberwell, London.
With them live daughter Isabella K, age 16, born East Indies, son George P age 14, born East Indies, and son Charles W, age 12, born East Indies.
Also living with them are 3 domestic servants.

1901 Census:
the Grant family live at No16 Alleyn Back, Camberwell
George Grant is head of family, aged 66, retired Brigade Surgeon, born in Scotland
Amy F Grant, his wife, is aged 46, born in India
George P Grant, son, is aged 24, a lieutenant in the British Army, born India
2 servants live in the house

1911 Census:
George Grant, age 76, Brigade Surgeon (Retired), born Glenlivet Banffshire, lives at Boreabole[?] Denbridge Rd, Beckley, in a 12 room house. His wife Amy Florence Grant, age 57, born Punjab India, also there, along with two domestic servants.

 
Grant Lt. Col. George
 
121 'GRANT, GEORGE PATRICK, was born 22 September 1876, and entered the Army on 5 September 1896, as a Second Lieutenant in the Border Regiment. He became Lieutenant 9 October 1899, and was transferred to the Indian Army 27 August 1901.

He served in Mekran in 1901; in the attack and capture of Nodiz Fort. For his services on this occasion he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 August 1902]. He was twice severely wounded, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 2 September 1902]: "George Patrick Grant, Lieutenant, Indian Staff Corps. For services during the capture of Nodiz Fort". He was invested by the King 24 October 1902. He was promoted to Captain 5 September 1905; was Staff Captain, India, 1 February to 3 June 1910; GS03, Headquarters, India, 1 July 1910 to 31 October 1912; DAA and QMG, Indian Army, 1 November 1912 to 31 January 1914.

He was promoted Major 5 September 1914, and served at different periods during the European War as Acting Lieutenant Colonel. He become a Second Grade General Staff Officer 20 February 1917. His regiment was the 106th Hazara Pioneers. He married, in 1902, Gladys, only daughter of Macdonald Beaumont, of Hylands, Epsom, and they had two daughters.'

Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
http://www.angloboerwar.com/medals-and-awards/non-boer-war/1886-distinguished-service-order-victorian-1886-1902

For an excellent and detailed description of the action at Nodiz Fort, and the events leading up to it, see this website:
http://www.kaiserscross.com/304501/420601.html

George P Grant was a Lt in the 27th Baluch Light Infantry at the time.

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Census records from younger years

1891 Census:
George Grant, age 56, retired army Surgeon, born Scotland, lives with his wife Amy F Grant age 37, born East Indies at Fairfield, Alleyn Park in Camberwell, London.
With them live daughter Isabella K, age 16, born East Indies, son George P age 14, born East Indies, and son Charles W, age 12, born East Indies.
Also living with them are 3 domestic servants.

Record of George in 1901 Census:
the Grant family live at No16 Alleyn Back, Camberwell
George Grant is head of family, aged 66, retired Brigade Surgeon, born in Scotland.
Amy F Grant, his wife, is aged 46, born in India
George P Grant, son, is aged 24, a lt. in the British Army, born India.
2 servants live in the house

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1909 Marriage record:
4th Dec 1909, Christ Church, Epsom.
Gladys Maude Constance Grant age 24 married George Patrick Grant age 33, Captain 106 Hazara Pioneers, Indian Army. His residence is registered as 'Fairfield' Upper Norwood, hers as 'Heylands' Epsom. His father is George Grant, Retired Colonel IMS, Her father is Macdonald Beaumont, Solicitor.

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record of death 1955:
GRANT George Patrick of Grove House, Woodbridge, Suffolk, died 16th May 1955. Probate Ipswich 19th July to Gladys Maud Constance Grant, widow. effects £6708 
Grant Lt. Col. George Patrick
 
122 Peter was a highlander, the son of a writer. His first job was as a school teacher in Glenlivet in the Cairngorms. It was here that he got married to Isabella, and they had 4 children before he decided to become a priest.
He joined the Church of Scotland, and became Minister, spending the rest of his life in the West of the Highlands in charge of the Small Isles parish based on the island of Eigg. His parish was made up of 5 islands and so he would have spent a lot of time sailing. He was also minister during a time of great change in terms of the Highland Clearances which affected all the islands in his parish.

Peter came as the minister to the island after a period of considerable religious instability. The minister two before him was dismissed for fornication and drunkeness (he didn't help his case by turning up at his church court hearing blind drunk). The next minister, Rev Swanson, who preceded Peter 1838-47 joined the evangelical Free Church movement after the Disruption of 1843 in the Church if Scotland. He was popular with the locals because the Free church movement's anti establishment pro-poor stance at a time of great hardship in the Highlands chimed with the population, and all but 3 parishioners from the Protestant community joined him. Quite how Peter Grant then went about returning them to the established church when he arrived is unclear. There was also a catholic priest in the island who ministered to his own flock.

Peter Grant was a Gaelic and English speaker, giving services in both languages every Sunday, and was responsible for getting the Established Church of Scotland church built on Eigg in 1862 (prior to that the schoolhouse was used for services), beside which he's buried.

+++++++++

He is mentioned in a history of the island called 'Eigg - the story of an island' in the following passages, which give us a rare glimpse of his character.

"Fishing on Eigg was lagging far behind Muck where the new owner, Captain Swinburne had established a salt depot and equipped the islanders with smacks capable of fishing Rockall, but it was catching up, especially since the arrival of Rev Grant and his son to the parish in 1848. Grant added to his income by catching basking sharks, and island tradition recalls how in the summer months the minister's smack would often be seen to divert it's course in pursuit of a shark whilst on its way to a church service in the other islands! George Grant the minister's eldest son, who had retired to Eigg from the Indian Medical Service, was now employing a crew of islanders to catch herring and gurnard on long lines. Fish were so plentiful that in one afternoon George Grant and two others managed to catch 494 gurnards with only 3 hooks!...

...The Edgeworth diaries made much of the polite social intercourse between the MacPhersons and their tenant farmers: The MacLeans in Kiell, as Kildonan was then called, the Stewarts at Laig, the minister and his family. The schoolmaster and the priest were also guests at Neag na Feannaig where 'reeling in the parlour' provided an agreeable distraction from reading novels and studying botany, when the young Grants occasionally dropped in with a fiddler...

...Great improvements were noticed on the glebe: 'capital oats in the morass Revd Grant had been draining, and all the ground up to it also except the rocks beautifully cultivated...

...Church services were held in the schoolhouse, the English service following the Gaelic one before the start of Sunday school in the afternoon, Edgeworth marvelling how the minister could bear three hours of preaching at a time...From 1862 onwards, services were held in the new church built out of local freestone..."

source: P.88-89 'Eigg the story of an island' by Camille Dressler, 1998, Polygon, Edinburgh.

Some background notes on the extracts from the Eigg book:
- The large MacPherson family (whose father had bought Eigg off the hereditary and debt-ridden ClanRanalds) might have been responsible for George Grant's interest in India since many of them served in the army, medical service and civil service there, and often came back to Eigg from India on leave.
- one can imagine that the 4 Grant children, 2 girls and 2 boys, would have made a welcome addition to any dance.
- the extract above says George Grant retired to Eigg after serving with the Indian Medical Service, but census records show him and his family living in London, so perhaps they continued to holiday in Eigg, hence the mention of fishing. Certainly George's obituary mentions how he and his brother a William loved to sail in the Small Isles throughout their lives (see George Grant's record). This affection is shown by the fact that both of them have commemoration plaques in the church on Eigg.
- From the 1840s to mid 1850s the population of Eigg dropped from about 540 to around 300 due to voluntary and 'assisted' emigration and the clearing of some townships. This happened during a mixture of changing farming methods across Britain, the potato famine which gripped the Highlands from 1847-54 and the pressures of population expansion & subdivision of crofts which affected the whole West Highland region.

++++++++

Entry in the record of Scottish Ministers:
'Small Isles or Eigg and Canna'

1848 PETER GRANT born 1796 son of George G., writer, and Christine McRoy; schoolmaster at Glenlivet; pres. by Queen Victoria 12th Oct. 1847; adm 20th April 1848; died 4th June 1864.
He marr. Isabella Smith, who died 16th Nov. 1865, aged 54, and had issue? William, CE born 1841, died 28th Oct. 1894;
Christian, born 1837, died 17th Nov. 1922; George, brigade surgeon, lieut. -colonel in the Indian Medical Service; Isabella (marr. John Grant Robertson, I.C.S.).
[the next minister starts 1864 so Peter must have died in office on Eigg]

source: Fasti Ecclesiæ Scoticanæ: the Succession of Ministers in the Church of Scotland from the Reformation (1915-), Scott, Hew, vol. 7 p. 178
http://archive.org/stream/fastiecclesiaesc00scot#page/176/mode/2up

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The evidence of Peter Grant being a schoolmaster in Glenlivet comes from his marriage record and the 1841 Census record:

Marriage Record 1830:
Inveravon Parish
'The 26th day of August 1830, Mr Peter Grant, Schoolmaster in Tomvoulin and Isabella Smith in Upper Drumin were married.'

1841 Census record:
Peter Grant, age 40, teacher, lives with Isabella Grant, age 30, in Tamvoulen in the Parish of Inveravon, Banff.
Living with them are children George age 6, Christina age 4, William age 3 months.

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1851 Census record:
The Manse, 'Sanderag'[Kildonan village], Small Isles Record:
Peter Grant, (age indecipherable), established minister, born Edinburgh, lives with his wife Isabella age 38, born Banffshire.
Living with them are son William age 10 'at school', and daughter Isabella age 4.
There are also 4 young servants living with them - a farm servant, herd, and two house servants.

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Record of Death 1864:
Small Isles Parish
Peter Grant, Clergyman (married), died June 6th 7pm at Sanday on Eigg, age 67.
Father, George Grant, Writer
Mother Christina Grant, maiden name Roy.
Cause of death "contraction of the...(illegible)"

He is buried at the south end of the Church facing over the Manse to the bay where he would often have set sail from on his shark hunting, fishing and ministering voyages. 
Grant Rev Peter
 
123 Sheila, family nickname 'Krimper', came to England aged 7, but always retained a love for India and could still speak some Hindi words at the end of her life. Head girl at Micklefield School, Seaford, County tennis and lacrosse player, played tennis with Errol Flynn, married John Whitty in 1937.

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Record of marriage Jan-Mar 1937, index of marriages.
Sheila H Grant, spouse surname Whitty, Hailsham in Sussex.

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She followed the Royal West Kents regiment to Palestine, son Hamlyn born 1938 in Haifa, returned to England, second son Kenneth born 1940 in Dorchester. Husband John killed in Italy by a landmine in October 1944.

Sheila later married childhood friend George Coldstream in 1949 and with him brought up her boys in Seaford. George rose up through the legal profession to become a judge and then 1st Secretary to the Lord Chancellor, and Sheila ran the house in Seaford when not up in London. A devoted mother and grandmother, she was a keen gardener up till her 90s. Asked in her old age what she would most like to do again if she could magically regain her youth, she replied 'I'd love to be able to play tennis again, to be able to dance, and to feel the heat of India'. 
Grant Sheila Hope
 
124 Was a Civil Engineer Grant William
 
125 TO THE MEMORY OF MRS. ANNE WHITTY.
Here lie beneath this marble stone consign'd,
Wife, mother, sister, Christian, all combin'd,
Each station gently fill'd by God approv'd,
She died lamented as she lived beloved.
The shaft by which the fatal blow was given,
No sting inflicting sent her soul to heaven.
Died 22nd Feb. 1826.

Gravestone St Mary’s Church of Ireland, Rathvilly

source: research notes of Mary Whitty 
Groome Anne
 
126 Her family were from Devon, settling in Paschoe House nr Colebrooke in Devon in 1611.

source: from the notes of Mary Whitty 
Hamlyn Elizabeth
 
127 1817 Marriage Record:
Abel Hampton and Sarah Watts, 8th April 1817, Keevil, Wiltshire.

1819 voter roll
Abel Hampton from Great Chiverell, tendering for a Freehold in Coate, occupation Yoeman, Freehold of House and Garden, occupied by Job Hiscock and another.

source: http://henly.familytreeguide.com/getperson.php?personID=I58602&tree=Allfamilies&PHPSESSID=eb47fe4dd165796161e7b8cce2f3c232
 
Hampton Abel
 
128 Abel started his working life as a servant in Wiltshire, then worked as a groom in Hampshire, and ended up being a 'fly proprietor' - running a number of one horse taxi carriages in London and hiring the drivers. From servant to employer, he was someone who raised his circumstances through his life using his knowledge of horses.

'The death of a horse could lead to a cab owner?s financial ruin. Another important ingredient was housing for the horses... By, 1823, the lighter horse cabs began to replace cumbersome hackney coaches in great quantity, and by the mid 1830?s, the hansom cab set the new standard for modern horse cabs. Aloysius Hansom, an architect, designed the first carriage. When Hansom went bankrupt through poor investments, John Chapman took over, designing an even lighter, more efficient cab, one whose framework did not strike the horses on their backs or sides whenever a carriage ran over an obstacle in the road."
source: an online review of 'Victorian and Edwardian Horse Cabs' by Trevor May

++++

1823 Christening record:
8th Jan 1823, Great Cheverell, Wiltshire, England
Father's name: Abel Hampton
Mother's name: Sarah

Jul-Sept 1847 Marriage record for Abel Hampton and Sarah B Barnes, at St Mary in Dinton.
http://www.wiltshirebmd.org.uk/cgi/marrind.cgi

1851 Census:
'Able' Hampton is recorded as living 'Under the Hill' at Alderbury in Wiltshire, aged 20. He's a servant, born in Chevrell Magna in Wiltshire, and is married to Sarah Hampton.
Sarah is aged 26 and comes from Dinton in Wiltshire.
There is a daughter called Sarah Ann Hampton, aged 2, born in Farley, Wiltshire, and a son called William Watts Hampton, aged 1, also born in Farley, Wiltshire.

[the 1851 Census record of his age would make him born 1831, but this is contrary to age given in the other two census records + burial + birth so this must have been a mistake]

1861 Census:
Abel Hampton is head of household at a Cottage in Dean, Hampshire, aged 38. He is a groom.
His wife Sarah B Hampton is aged 36, is a Groom's wife (and another word I can't read).
Daughter Sarah A Hampton is 12 yrs old, and William W Hampton is aged 11 and is an Under Groom.
A Daughter called Jane D Hampton is aged 9.

1871 Census:
Abel Hampton, aged 48, is a 'Cab Proprietor', living at 15 St Johns Villas, Colney Hatch, Edmonton, Middlesex.
His wife Sarah B Hampton is aged 46.
Daughter Sarah A Hampton is a Housemaid aged 22.
William W Hampton is a son aged 21 and a Ships Steward.
Daughter Jane D Hampton aged 19 is a school mistress.

[Colney Hatch is a road that runs through Muswell Hill, North of Alexandra Palace)

1872 Electoral Roll.
Abel Hampton listed as occupier and tenant of house, Grove Rd, Colney Hatch.

1873 death register
Abel Hammond, aged 50, from Edmonton

1873 Will
8th Aug: Effects under £200
Administration of the effects of Abel Hampton, late of 15 St John's Villas, New Southgate in the county of Middlesex. Fly Proprietor who died on the High Rd between Wood Green and Colney Hatch in the said County was granted at the Principal registry to Sarah Baker Hampton of 15 St John's villas Widow the relict.

 
Hampton Abel
 
129 source: http://henly.familytreeguide.com/getperson.php?personID=I58601&tree=Allfamilies Hampton Abel
 
130 1861 Census:
Abel Hampton is head of household at a Cottage in Dean, Hampshire, aged 38. He is a groom.
His wife Sarah B Hampton is aged 36, is a Groom's wife (and another word I can't read).
Daughter Sarah A Hampton is 12 yrs old, and William W Hampton is aged 11 and is an Under Groom.
A Daughter called Jane D Hampton is aged 9. 
Hampton Jane D
 
131 1871 Census: Abel Hampton, aged 48, is a 'Cap Proprietor', living at 15 St Johns Villas, Colney Hatch, Edmonton, Middlesex.
His wife Sarah B Hampton is aged 46.
Daughter Sarah A Hampton is a Housemaid aged 22.
William W Hampton is a son aged 21 and a Ships Steward.
Daughter Jane D Hampton aged 19 is a school mistress. 
Hampton Jane D
 
132 1881 Census:
Sarah B. Hampton, aged 56, living in St Mary's Rd, Gt Bowden, Leicestershire.
Mother-in-law of Robert Cotton and Jane D Cotton (daughter)  
Hampton Jane D
 
133 source: http://henly.familytreeguide.com/getperson.php?personID=I58700&tree=Allfamilies Hampton John
 
134 Marguerite was born in East London, and moved to Australia before she was 10 (there's no record of her in the 1891 UK Census). She was an only child. Her father was a Master Mariner who captained ships along the coasts of Australia and her mother brought her up in Marrickville, a suburb of Sydney, after her father died when she was 12. She married Henry Hamlyn Whitty, a wealthy farmer from NSW at 23, and had three children, before moving back to live in Sussex, England with her family.

+++++++

Birth record 1881:
Marguerite Louise Hampton, Baptised 2nd Aug 1881
at St Phillips, Stepney, London.
Parents lived at 511 Commercial Rd, Stepney, London.
Father's name William Watts Hampton, Mother Emma Jane Hampton

+++++++

1904 Marriage record, Australia:
Marguerite L Hampton to Henry H Whitty
Marrickville, New South Wales

++++++

8th Dec 1922 Passnger List
On board the 'Benalla' from Melbourne, arriving in London were Henry Whitty (grazier aged 50), Margurite Whitty (wife, aged 39), Margurite Whitty (scholar aged 17), John Whitty (aged 12) and Mary H whitty aged 9.
their home address is Dewhurst Lodge, Wadhurst, Sussex

16th Dec 1927 Passenger List
We've got a record of Henry and Marguerite Whitty arriving from Australia in the port of Southampton.
They'd been passengers on the 'Largs Bay', and had joined the ship at Melbourne.
Their address is given as Dewhurst Lodge, Sussex
Henry's occupation is 'grazier'
Henry is aged 55, Marguerite aged 44

The 1933 Electoral Role in Australia has both Henry Hamlyn Whitty - listed at address No.2 Vera st, Corowa, Riverina District, NSW - as a pastoralist, but also his wife Marguerite Louise Whitty, 'home duties'.

On the death of her husband Henry, Marguerite is stated as living in Pottens Mill, Broad Oak, Heathfield, Sussex.
source: the London Gazette, 5th Jan 1940

+++++

At her death she's recorded as living at Little Greendown, 98 Warwick Park, Tunbridge Wells. she had £10,855 to her name in the probate.
Source: National Probate calendar 1858-1966 
Hampton Marguerite Louise
 
135 Source: http://henly.familytreeguide.com/getperson.php?personID=I58608&tree=Allfamilies Hampton Robert
 
136 source: http://henly.familytreeguide.com/getperson.php?personID=I58700&tree=Allfamilies Hampton Robert
 
137 source: http://henly.familytreeguide.com/getperson.php?personID=I59377&tree=Allfamilies Hampton Robert
 
138 1851 Census:
'Able' Hampton is recorded as living 'Under the Hill' at Alderbury in Wiltshire, aged 20. He's a servant, born in Chevrell Magna in Wiltshire, and is married to Sarah Hampton.
Sarah is aged 26 and comes from Dinton in Wiltshire.
There is a daughter called Sarah Ann Hampton, aged 2, born in Farley, Wiltshire, and a son called William Watts Hampton, aged 1, also born in Farley, Wiltshire. 
Hampton Sarah Ann
 
139 1861 Census:
Abel Hampton is head of household at a Cottage in Dean, Hampshire, aged 38. He is a groom.
His wife Sarah B Hampton is aged 36, is a Groom's wife (and another word I can't read).
Daughter Sarah A Hampton is 12 yrs old, and William W Hampton is aged 11 and is an Under Groom.
A Daughter called Jane D Hampton is aged 9. 
Hampton Sarah Ann
 
140 1871 Census: Abel Hampton, aged 48, is a 'Cap Proprietor', living at 15 St Johns Villas, Colney Hatch, Edmonton, Middlesex.
His wife Sarah B Hampton is aged 46.
Daughter Sarah A Hampton is a Housemaid aged 22.
William W Hampton is a son aged 21 and a Ships Steward.
Daughter Jane D Hampton aged 19 is a school mistress. 
Hampton Sarah Ann
 
141 William was a merchant sailor who was brought up in the East End of London just a few streets away from the Thames which would have been crowded with shipping from the Empire, and probably gave him his love of boats. By the age of 25 he was a Mate in the Merchant Service, and by the end of his relatively short life he was the Master of various steam driven passenger and cargo ships on the East coast of Australia, making regular runs.
He died at Calcutta in India, the cause of death and why he was there have yet to be revealed.

From 1887 to 1892 William is recorded as the Master (essentially the Captain since there wasn't one) of various steamers arriving in Sydney from Australian ports. Some records have been attached above.

There is a good description of one voyage he took from Britain to Australia as Captain of the "Maranoa", the last of 3 ships built to order for the Queensland Steamship Company to carry 60 first class and 80 second class passengers. the beginning of the article praises the luxury fittings in the saloon etc, and tells us she used on average 27 tons of coal per day and filled up with 1000 tonnes for the votage to Australia when she left on 19th Oct at 1:53pm from London...

"On the 19th she encountered a heavy westerly gale in the English Channel, and the engines had to be slowed in consequence. After adjusting compasses at Portland the Maranoa took her departure at 8:30am on the 20th and experienced strong easterly winds with heavy sea and fine, clear weather up to Cape Vincent; thence she had strong head winds until passing Gibralter at 6:30 pm on the 24th October. Malta was reached on the 28th at 3:30am and after a quantity of coal had been taken on board the passage was resumed at 4:23pm. Squally and insettled weather prevailed up until Port Said, where she arrived at 5:45am on the first instant and took in a further supply of fuel. The canal was navigated without incident; Suex was touched at on 3rd ultimo and Aden was reached on the 8th ultimo, after a hot passage down the Red Sea. She left again the same day, and as the weather was fine and the sea smooth, the Maranoa made a fine run of 7 days to Colombo, the engines working splendidly the whole time. On the following day she got under weigh again and had fine weather and light breezes to 5.8 whence she had to do some hard steaming against SE trades, which occassionally increased to a moderate gale, and were attended with a high head sea until the 30th parallel was reached, when the wind moderated somewhat but continued from the same direction. From 90 miles south of the Leuwin to Lonf 124 E she encountered a series of strong easterly gales accompanied by a high sea, but she behaved admirably. Light to moderate breezes with occassionaly foggy days were had after that till Adelaide was reached at 11:20am on on the 6th instant. After landing passnegers the voyage was resumed at 3:23pm same day, and she arrived at Sandridge pier Melbourne at 9am on the 8th. More passengers were landed here and the Maranoa got under weigh for Sydney at 2:30pm, passed through port Phillip Heads at 3:40pm, rounded Wilson's Promotary at 1:45 am on the 9th passed Cabo island at 4pm and entered Sydney Heads at 10:35 am yesterday, thus making the passage from Port Phillip Heads to Sydney in 40 hours 55 minutes. the Maranoa is Captained by W W Hampton, late of the British-India Steam Navigation Company, in which service he has been long and favourably known as having had large experience in their first-class passanger ships trading between England and India."

Sydney Morning Herald, Tues 11th Dec 1883
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/13546751

++++++++

1851 Census:
'Able' Hampton is recorded as living 'Under the Hill' at Alderbury in Wiltshire, aged 20. He's a servant, born in Chevrell Magna in Wiltshire, and is married to Sarah Hampton.
Sarah is aged 26 and comes from Dinton in Wiltshire.
There is a daughter called Sarah Ann Hampton, aged 2, born in Farley, Wiltshire, and a son called William Watts Hampton, aged 1, also born in Farley, Wiltshire.

1861 Census:
Abel Hampton is head of household at a Cottage in Dean, Hampshire, aged 38. He is a groom.
His wife Sarah B Hampton is aged 36, is a Groom's wife (and another word I can't read).
Daughter Sarah A Hampton is 12 yrs old, and William W Hampton is aged 11 and is an Under Groom.
A Daughter called Jane D Hampton is aged 9.

+++++++

17th feb 1875, William Watts Hampton qualifies as Only Mate in the Merchant Service, by Order of the Board of Trade.

14th June 1878, William Watts Hampton qualifies as First Mate in the Merchant Service, by Order of the Board of Trade.

30th Oct 1879, William Watts Hampton qualifies as Master in the Merchant Service, by Order of the Board of Trade.

++++++++

Marriage record 12th Oct 1880:
William Watts Hampton marriage registered in 1880 in Stepney. At his marriage he and Emma Jane are registered as living at 61 Nelson st. His father Abel Hampton is given as deceased.

On Sept 19th 1880, William's age is given as 31 on the record of the Banns of Marriage.

1881 Census: William W Hampton is living at 511 Commercial rd, Tower Hamlets, Mile End, London. He's agd 31 and he's a 'Mariner Merchant Service'. Emma J Hampton is his wife aged 27.

profession given at baptism of his daughter in 1881 as 'Master Mariner'.

++++++++

Theres a record of Hampton William, Master Mariner living at No. 12 Orwell st in Sydney, Australia
unfortunately its undated

Good record of a voyage he took from UK to Australia:
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/13546751

++++++++

1891 Master of the Maranoa:

Mariners & ships in Australian Waters
'MARANOA' OF BRISBANE, WILLIAM WATTS HAMPTON, MASTER
BURTHEN 805 TONS FROM THE PORT OF BRISBANE TO SYDNEY, NEW SOUTH WALES 16TH OCTOBER, 1891
source: State Records Authority of New South Wales: Shipping Master's Office; Passengers Arriving 1855 - 1922; NRS13278, [X212-X213] reel 505. Transcribed by Joan Bell.

The Maranoa facts n figures:
Steel steamship, passenger-cargo built by W Denny & Bros., Dumbarton for QSS Co. Of Ausn Co April 1887, working their major routes along the east coast. Sold 1911 to Bombay interests for scrapping

The Queensland Steam Shipping Company (QSS Co) was a shipping company of Australia from 1885 to 1887.[1] The company was formed by the British India Steam Navigation Company, Charles Parbury, James Burns and McIlwraith McEacharn & Company. The shipping company was amalgamated with the Australasian Steam Navigation Company with their respective vessels in 1887 to form the Australasian United Steam Navigation Company
source: wikipedia
+++++++++

Record of Death 23rd Jan 1893:
'William Watts Hampton of 83 Victoria Street, Sydney, New South Wales, died 23rd January 1893 at Calcutta Indian Administration (with Will) London 14th July to James Alfred Shephard dental surgeon, the attorney of Emma Jane Hampton, widow, Effects £300." 
Hampton William Watts
 
142 Eliza Reeve had 5 children but died young, apparantly during a miscarriage.

Her husband Hugh was a soldier in the Madras Army and went on to become a Lt Gen, but being left with young children, they were sent to England to be brought up.

Their 5 children were; Hugh, Eliza, catherine, Isabella, Catherine

source: notes of Mary Whitty


 
Harris Eliza Reeve
 
143 Frances Russell, christened 1752 married in Rugby January 1781 to Rev Charles Wallington (b 1750), of Dursley Gloucestershire and Rector of Hawkwell (aka Hackwell), Essex.

The Wallington family had been established at Dursley in Gloucestershire since the middle of the 17th century; their family home was Pier's Court near Stinchcombe (where Evelyn Waugh lived from 1937 until 1956).

Rev Charles is also recorded as living at Haven Green, Ealing, Middlesex, where he tutored candidates for entry to Oxford and Cambridge.

+++++++

CHILDREN:
1. Charles Arthur Granado (1785 - 1867), Major General Bengal Army, Honourable East India Company (HEIC).

2. Frances Ann b 1787

3. John Clement Wallington was born in Ealing, Middlesex, on 5 July 1792. He was first commissioned as a Cornet, without purchase, into the 12th Dragoons on 21 October 1813. He exchanged into the 10th Hussars on 12 November 1814 and purchased his Lieutenancy on the 27th of the same month. He served in France and the Netherlands, from April 1815 to January 1816, and was present at the battles of Quatre Bras and Waterloo. According to a typed note once accompanying this medal (but no longer present) ?His charger was shot from under him at Waterloo by a cannon ball which went on to kill a fellow officer and is on exhibition at the Imperial War Museum.?

Wallington became a Captain in the 10th Hussars, by purchase, on 16 December 1824. He accompanied the regiment on the expedition to Portugal from January 1827 until March 1828, in support of the Prince Regent of Portugal against a hostile aggression from Spain. Promoted to Major in 1833, and to Lieutenant-Colonel in 1846, Wallington briefly held command of the 10th Hussars before retiring in the same year. Lieutenant-Colonel Wallington died about 1875.
source: http://www.dnw.co.uk/medals/auctionarchive/searchcataloguearchive/itemdetail.lasso?itemid=39064

In 1823 he married Alicia Isabella Mason, daughter of Charles Monck Mason, in Dublin. He died in 1872 at Leamington, Warwickshire.
 
Harris Frances Russell
 
144 Hamlyn was born in Ireland, the son of a relatively famous general from the Napoleonic wars. He became a soldier himself in India with the East India Company and rose through the ranks to Major General in the Madras Native Infantry. He and his wife had 9 children before they retired to live in Bristol, Somerset. He married a second time after his first wife died.

Hamlyn applied to be a cadet in the Honourable East India Company 1821/2, and joined the Madras Army. The Madras Presidency covered much of Southern India. He became a Lieutenant in the 15th regt in 1832, Major in 1846, Lt Col in 1854, Colonel in 1857 and Major General in 1861 in the 15th Madras Native Infantry.
source: 'Alphabetical list of Officers of the Madras Army' published in 1838.

The 15th Madras Native Infantry regiment had been raised in the 1770s during the Carnatic Campaign, and then became the 15th Madras from 1824-1885. Although the 15th was busy at the start of the century and in Afghanistan and Burma at the end, it seems Hamlyn was serving with them during a prolonged period of peace when they saw no major action.

In the 1830s the Madras Army was concerned with internal security and support for the civil administration. This was a multi-ethnic army in which the British officers were encouraged to learn and speak Asian languages. In 1832-1833 the Madras Army put down a rebellion in the Visakhapatnam district.

The Army of the Madras Presidency remained almost unaffected by the Indian Rebellion of 1857. By contrast with the larger Bengal Army where all but twelve (out of eighty-four) infantry and cavalry regiments either mutinied or were disbanded, all fifty-two regiments of Madras Native Infantry remained loyal and passed into the new Indian Army when direct British Crown rule replaced that of the Honourable East India Company.
source: wikipedia

According to the India Office Records held in the National Archives, Hamlyn retired from the army on 31st Dec 1861, and died on 1st Nov 1869 in Bristol.

++++++

Florence Stacy in her Whitty family memoir suggests that despite a full pension, there were financial pressures for Hamlyn Lavicount: Eliza was now an invalid and needed constant nursing care, Isabella was to go to London for an operation which it was hoped would enable her to walk better, Henry needed financial assistance because his Army pay as a lieutenant in the Madras Army was relatively small, and Harriet, Mary and Wiiliam were all still in various stages of education (see below).
[Hamlyn was a Major General when he left the Madras Army, not a lieutenant, so not sure the above note is correct about his pay]

By 1867 Hamlyn and his wife were living in Bristol. Eliza died at Frankfort House, Whiteladies Road, Clifton on 1 April 1867 of cancer of the stomach, following at least two unsuccessful operations and a prolonged period of ill-health.

Hamlyn Lavicount remarried in Bristol in 1869, shortly before his own death in the same year of a stroke at 2 Eastfield Villas Westbury on Trym (now a northern suburb of the city of Bristol). His death certificate suggests that he had had a previous stroke: the cause of death is given as 'disease of the brain with partial paralysis' and 'apoplexy 24 hours'.

Source: from notes of Mary Whitty

++++++

Marriage record 1832:
At Bangalore, Lieut. Hamlyn Lavicount Harris, 15th regt. N.I., to Eliza Cobden, eldest daughter of the Rev. W. Reeve.
East India Register and Directory Marriage Announcements

1861 Census Record:
Hamlyn L Harris, age 55, Colonel East India Service, born Ireland, was living with his wife Eliza age 44, born India (East), at Bouron Court in Flax Bourton.
with them live daughters Harriet age 18, Mary age 12 and son William age 7, and Isabella, all born India (East).
Also living there are 3 domestic servants.

He married a second time to a Charlotte Evans on 15th May 1868, after his wife Eliza died on 1st April 1867.

1869 Probate record:

The will with a codicile of Hamlyn Lavicount Harris, late of 2 Eastfield Villas, Westbury-pon-Trym, Gloucestershire, late General in Her Majesty's army, deceased, who died 1st November 1869 at 2 Eastfield Villas aforesaid, was proved at Bristol by the oath of Charlotte Harris of 2 Eastfield Villas aforesaid, wido, the relict, the sole executrix. Effects under £300.

 
Harris Maj. Gen. Hamlyn Lavicount
 
145 The following obituary from ?The Queenslander' 18th July 1925 for Mary?s brother Hamlyn shows the connection between the Harris and Whitty families on Australia, which is probably how Henry Whitty came to meet Mary through her brother:

Harris, Hamlyn Lavicourt (1845 - 1925)
A sturdy old pioneer of New South Wales passed away with the death of Mr. Hamlyn Lavicourt Harris on July 5, at Werinatong Station, Tumut, N.S.W. The late Mr. Hamlyn Harris was approaching his 80th year when he died. He was the only surviving son of General Lavicourt Harris (India), and came to New South Wales in early life, taking up jackerooing on Mr. Henry Whitty's station Tarramia, N.S.W., who later married Mr. Harris's sister. Subsequently Mr. Edward Brown, who also married into the Harris family, and who was a brother of Mr. Nugent Wade-Brown, of Ban Ban, Queensland, took up a station conjointly with Mr. Harris near Tumut. The late Mr. Harris's youngest daughter is the wife of Dr. Hamlyn-Harris, D.Sc. who is at present senior science master at the Southport High School.

According to his daughter Florence Stacy, Hamlyn was originally intended for the Army but instead chose to try life in Australia with encouragement from Henry Tarlton?s mother-in-law, Charlotte Brown, whose son was farming at Blowering near Tumut, NSW, and to whom she arranged an introduction for Hamlyn. Hamlyn?s father was prepared, according to Florence Stacy, to give his son his passage, a good outfit and £20 to enable this move.

Hamlyn arrived in Australia on board the ?Orwell? on 25 February 1864 aged 19 and by May of that year was working at Blowering station for Edward George Brown. He stayed there until 1869 when Edward Brown decided to let Blowering. In 1869 he left Blowering and worked on various farms until 1871 when Mary Hamlyn and Henry Tarlton arrived in Australia and he was offered a temporary job and accommodation at Taramia. In 1872 in Tumut he married Emily Lucy Louisa Shelley (1851- 1937) whom he had known since his arrival in Australia in 1864.

In 1872 he and Edward George Brown bought Wermatong station, Tumut, from the Shelley family and by 1873 he and his wife had moved from Taramia to Wermatong, where he lived for the rest of his life.

13 Children; Emily Florence, Eva, Eric, Noel, Vida, Geoffrey, Nettie, Eliza, Edna, Bertha, Clement, George, Hamlyn.

source: notes of Mary Whitty
++++++
there is a book about him here:
http://library.sl.nsw.gov.au/search~S2?/XSir+William+Dixson+Library.&SORT=D&searchscope=2/XSir+William+Dixson+Library.&SORT=D&searchscope=2&SUBKEY=Sir+William+Dixson+Library./451%2C16188%2C16188%2CE/frameset&FF=XSir+William+Dixson+Library.&SORT=D&searchscope=2&465%2C465%2C
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The following information provided by Karilyn Pawley:

Description: d. 5 July 1925 'Wermatong Station, Tumut, NSW, AUS
bur. Tumut Anglican Cemetery, NSW
m. Emily Lucy Louisa Shelley b. 1851 Gundaroo, NSW, AUS daughter of George Shelley and Amelia Matilda Waddy
d. Wermatong Station, Tumut, NSW, AUS
bur. Tumut Anglican Cemetery, NSW
c. 1 Emily Florence b. 29 October 1872
2 Eva Hamlyn b. 19 June 1874
3 Eric Hamlyn b. 10 May 1876
4 Noel Henry b. 1877
5 Vida Hamlyn b. 13 Nov 1897
6 Geoffrey Hamlyn Lavicount b. 28 oct 1881
7 Nettie Huntingdon b. 1883
8 Eliza Amelia 'Nell' b. 1885
9 Edna Hamlyn b. 1888
10 Bertha Hamlyn Harris b. 16 May 1889
11 Clement Wallington b. 17 July 1891
12 George Thomas Hamlyn b. 2 Nov 1893
13 Hamlyn Lavicount Vernon b. 12 Nov 1895
All children were born at Wermatong Station, Tumut, NSW

Adelong Argus, Tumut & Gundagai Advertiser Thursday 9 July 1925 p2
Obituary
MR. H. L. HARRIS.
Mr. Hamlyn Lavicount Harris (whose death we briefly reported in our last issue), was born in the East Indies on August 14, 1845, and was the son of Major-General Hamlyn L. Harris, 10th Regt. Madras Native Infantry, E.I.C.S. His mother was the daughter of one of the first Congregational Missionaries in India, and although many years have passed since her death, the influence of her wonderfully spiritual character never left him, and her name was on his lips frequently during his last illness. Perhaps it was due to his in- heritance from both parents that he attained beyond ordinary measure to that combination of 'gentleness wed to manhood which makes the man.'
His earliest days were spoilt in In- dia at various Hill Stations, at Coun- batore, Otacamund and in Madras, and a lasting impression of the Ori- ental life was left upon his mind and he loved to talk of the wild animals, the bntterflies and the native tribes. He became a collector of but- terflies and when later on he left England his beautiful collection was sold for the benefit of Mr. Mueller's orphanage in Bristol. From both parents he also inherited artistic tastes and could do remarkably good pencil sketches of any subject. When eight years of age he was taken to England and was educated at the Rev. Joseph Fletcher's school and afterwards entered New College, Clifton. He then began to study for the army, at Sandhurst, but owing to a suggestion made by Mrs. Brown (Mrs. E. G. Brown's mother) he de- cided to come to Australia.
In company with Mr F. Campbell (late of Red Hills, Tumut) he came out in a sailing ship, in 1963, arriving in Tumut in March 1804. After coaching to Gundagai, he rode to Tumut, dismounting on the way to join in a game of cricket with some boys. Arriving at Tumut, he made some purchases at Mandelson's store, and spoke to Mr John Weeden who was then a lad, also from England. Continuing his journey to Tumut Plains, he had to cross the river by punt at Blow- ering (near Jones' Bridge). He spent his first night in Tumut at Tumut Plains (now Camelot) House and met
his wife who was then twelve years of age. He lived for four years at Blowering with Mr E. G. Brown, and after some further experience at Weo- go Station near Grenfell, and Captain Campbell's Station, Bombala, he, in conjunction with Mr. Brown, bought from Mrs. Shelley the Tumut Plains Estate (with the exception of the ori- ginal grant of 1200 acres) and he came managing partner, living in a se- lection house called Wermatong, built by Mr. G. Shelley, jnr. In 1872, he married Miss Emily Shelley, youngest daughter of the first landholder in the Tumut district, and from that time (with the exception of one year at Tarramea, on the Murray) Mr. and Mrs Harris have lived in the old Wer- matong house with additions, and have reared a family of twelve child- ren, namely, Mrs. A. N. Stacy, Camelot, Tumut Plains ; Mrs. J. W. Mech- am, 128 Grey St., E. Melbourne; Noel H. Harris, Oxley, Gilmore ; Mrs. E. Nixon, Bunnydoon, Dunedoo; Major G. H. L Harris, Tumut; Mrs. E. Walker, The Rectory, Wollongong ; Mrs. H. Scott, Commercial Bank, Bogan Gate; Mrs. Edna Harris; Mrs. R. Hamlyn-Harris, Southport School (Q.) ; Capt. C. W. Harris, Bank of N.S.W., Temora; G. T. H. Harris (A.I.F.), University, Sydney; H. L. Vernon Harris, A.I.F., Wermatong. In 1890 Mr. and Mrs. Harris visited England, and saw again the scenes of his boyhood, and in 1903, they paid a trip to his birthplace, E. India. In 1895 Mrs. E. G. Brown sold her interest in the Tumut Plains estate to Mr. Harris.
He led a very active life, both as a station manager and as an enthusiastic cricketer, until in 1897 he was seized with an apoplectic fit which left him partially paralysed. From this attack he gradually recov-ered until in 1911-12 he suffered from three succesive strokes which permanently crippled him and for 14 years he had been unable to walk unassisted. In spite of his disabilities he taught himself to write and draw with pencil and paint with his left hand, and he made several motor trips to visit various members of his family. He was carried into church in order to take part in the Centenary Services. Through all his long years of suffering he has been cared for and nursed until the last six months, by his devoted wife, who is herself , almost 73 years of age. Mr. Harris was first and foremost a home man, and a dearly loved and loving husbund and father. He was a staunch churchman and ever while able, took a prominent part in church affairs, as lay reader, warden and assistant in the choir. He was a Freemason, and a member of the A. and P. Association. He had also fine social qualities, was musical and a good amateur actor, and in- tensely patriotic, but over and above all his noble qualities, he will ever be remembered as heroic in his patient gentleness through all his long years of suffering. He died in his sleep at 1 a.m. on Sunday morning, July 5th. The remains were interred in the Anglican portion of the new cemetery at Tumut on Tuesday afternoon, the Rector of All Saints, Rev. T. A. Gair conducting the service. The pall-bearers were deceased's five sons and Mr. Hamlyn H. Whitty, a nephew. Among the numerous floral tributes from relations and friends were wreaths from the Returned Soldiers' League, the C. of E. Girls' Club, and from the Chinese tenants. The cof- fin bore the inscription, 'Hamlyn Lavicount Harris, born Aug. 16. 1845; died July 5, 1925; aged 80 years. I shall be satisfied when I awake with Thy likeness. At Rest.'

Tumut & Adelong Times Tuesday 1 June 1937 p1
MRS. EMILY LUCY LOUISE HARRIS
One of the noblesse of this district and revered by the legion of friends and acquaintances, passed to the Great Beyond at 1 a.m. on Sunday last, at the 'Wermatong Station' homestead, where she had resided all her married life, in the person of Mrs. Emily Louise Harris, relict of the late Mr. Hamlyn Lavicourt Harris, who predeceased her by a number of years. She had reached the ripe age of 86 years. The funeral took place yesterday after noon after a service at the home. Rev. Walker, Rector of Wollong ong, and Rev. S. Broadfoot, Rector of St. Paul's, Tumut, officiating. Full obituary will appear in Friday's issue.
++++++++
 
Harris Hamlyn Lavicount
 
146 Robert founded the United Nilgiri Tea Estates and other family businesses. In 1862, he founded Stanes Secondary School Coimbatore (originally for Eurasian children) and in 1872 founded the Stanes High School.

In 1913 he was awarded Kaiser-i-Hind Gold Medal for services to Coimbatore and education and he was knighted in 1920.

Children; Winifred, George, Mary, Edith, Lily, Frederick, Eva, Maud.

source: notes of Mary Whitty
 
Harris Harriet Huntingdon
 
147 Lieutenant in the Royal Navy, Dies in a fall from the mast of his ship ‘Caledonia’. This incident was described by Clement Bettesworth Harris in his ‘Brief Memoir’ as being the result of a wager with a marine officer as to who could perform ‘certain evolutions aloft in the quickest time’;
 
Harris Henry Thomas
 
148 Very little is known of Isabella, except that she was born with some form of disability which left her lame. Florence Stacy, in her memoir of her father Hamlyn Lavicount, states that the family had planned for her to go to London for a remedial operation in the early 1860s and that she lived in the house of a medical practitioner until her death. She died unmarried on 6 January 1915.

source: notes of Mary Whitty
 
Harris Isabella Hamlyn
 
149 Henry thomas was a soldier.
He became an east India Company cadet in 1853, joining the 17th Madras Native Infantry as a Lt. By 1858 he was a Major in the 22nd Madras Native Infantry, and then Lt Col 40th Madras Native Infantry

1881 census the family were resident in Clifton, Bristol.

Henry Thomas died of acute malaria at the Bowring Institute in Bangalore in India.

His wife is recorded in the 1901 census as staying with her widowed sister-in-law Isabella Harris, the second wife of Noel Hamlyn Harris in Bournemouth.

Henry and Anne had one child, Annie.


 
Harris Lt. Col. Henry Thomas
 
150 Henry Hamlyn became a Cadet in 1798. Arrived in India 1800. died Sikandara, 29th August 1804, killed in action during Monson's retreat. Son of Rev. Hamlyn Harris, Vicar of Exton. Services: Second Mahratta War; battle of Delhi; Agra, Gwalior; Monson's Retreat in the Second Mahratta War.

He was an unmarried lieutenant in the 14th Native Infantry when he was killed. Possibly taken prisoner by Holkar on 16th of July, 1804, during Col. Monson's retreat, and subsequently murdered by him near Fatehpur Sikri.

He died an unmarried lieutenant in the 14th Native Infantry on 29 August 1804, killed in action :
source: Hodsons Bengal Army 1736 -1834, via notes of Mary Whitty.
 
Harris Lt. Henry Hamlyn
 

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