Notes


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   Notes   Linked to 
1 Archbishop of Armagh Family: F234
 
2 Indian Army Family: F181
 
3 Rector of Datchworth, Herts Family: F198
 
4 she died in childbirth Family: F225
 
5 son of 'Capability Brown' (Lancelot Brown) the famous landscape architect Family: F199
 
6 they had three sons and two daughters Family: F190
 
7 Vicar of Eaton Soco,. Beds. for 39 years Family: F201
 
8 Vicar of Holy Trinity, Louth. Vicar of Emmanuel, streatham, Vicar of Hampstead, Rector of Fenny Compton Warwickshire, Canon of Coventry Family: F203
 
9 Vicar of Luddington, Lincs.  Family: F191
 
10 William Gollan is described as a 'Cooper' in his daughter Margaret's death records.

Coopers made wooden barrels to hold dry goods like cereals, flour, vegetables, or for holding liquid like wash tubs, butter churns, or beer. 
Family: F246
 
11 daughter of Martyn of Tullyra 
 
12 1851 Census record:
Parish of St Georges in the East
Thomas A Sheppard, aged 57 lives in No.3 Walburg st (one of 3 families at that address). Professor of music (?), born in Shadwell.
Wife Elizabeth is aged 35, and was born in Ludbury, Suffolk
Albert Sheppard, son is aged 11
Julia, daughter aged 9
Edwin, son aged 6
 
Elizabeth
 
13 By the time of 1851 Census, Thomas Allen Sheppard has a different wife called Elizabeth, and their oldest was born in 1840 so Harriet probably died before then. Harriet
 
14 Frederick's birth record 1817 from Parish of St George, Middlesex.
29th Sept 1817, father Thomas Allen Sheppard, Mother Harriet. Parents lived at Fox's Lane, Shadwell.
Thomas Allen's profession is 'Musician'. 
Harriet
 
15 daughter of Walter Taylor of Balmacragh and Castle Staunton Janet
 
16 Noel Hamlyn was a soldier.
Lt in the Royal Artillery 1854 (in Crimea, awarded Legion d'Honneur 5th class 1856), Captain 1860, Major 1872, Lt Col 1880, Colonel 1884 Retired with honorary rank of Major General 1885.

In 1864 he was in Ceylon with his battery, and in 1879 he took part in the second Anglo-Afghan war (1878 - 80).

Married Louisa Ensor in 1861 in Newton Abbot, Devon. She was daughter of Rev Frederic Ensor, Vicar of Lustleigh, Devon.
Children of Noel and Louisa; Emily, Gerard, Henry, Sybilla, Leslie, Ivy.

source: notes of Mary Whitty
 
Maj Gen Noel Hamlyn Harris
 
17 of Wellington Mary
 
18 she then married E. Bedford after Antonini, according to McDonald Beaumont notes. unknown
 
19 He was an apothecary from Ollerton, Co. Notts. Allen Thomas
 
20 1871 Census:
the family live in Surbiton Park Crescent.
Fransisco M Antonini, aged 67, is a retired Merchant, born in Italy
Charles Antonini, son aged 29, is a surgeon in Kings college
Maude 17, Rose 13 and Frank agd 10 are other children.

6 domestic servants live with them. 
Antonini Charles
 
21 Surgeon at Kings college Antonini Charles
 
22 Emily, a second generation Italian grew up in a wealthy family. She worked in Dorset (or at least thats where the marriage banns were read) and was married aged 22 to McDonald, a solicitor. They had two children in London before they moved to Seaford on the Sussex coast, and she would have lived a comfortable life since both her and her husband's families were well off.

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1861 Census:
Antonini family live in Prospect House, Surbiton Crescent, Kingston Surrey
Francis M Antonini is aged 55, landholder, born in Italy.
Dinah A Antonini is aged 41, born London
Matilda Antonini aged 7, born London
Emily Antonini aged 5, born London
Rose Antonini aged 3, born London
Francis M Antonini aged 6 months, born London

There are also 3 older stepdaughters and a stepson with the surname Davey.
And 8 domestic servants (!); cook, upper nurse, under nurse, upper housemaid, under housemaid, laundry maid, kitchen maid, housekeeper (?).
So Francis Antonini must have been rich

1881 Census:
Emily Antonini, aged 25, visiting No. 32 Blessington Rd, Lee, London.
She was a visitor in someone eleses house at time of Census. Occuptation listed as 'annuitant', born in London, Middlesex

* Blessington Rd is where her father-in-law James Beaumont is living in the 1871 census, so perhaps this is where Emily met MacDonald, or where her husband's family moved on her recommendation.

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1883 Marriage Banns:
Read out in Parkstone St Peter, Dorset
MacDonald Beaumont, bachelor of Lee Parish in Kent, and Emily Antonini spinster of this Parish.
(So Emily must have moved to Dorset for work?)

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1891 census:
Family live at No.8 Morden rd in Kidbrooke.
Father McDonald Beaumont is a solicitor aged 33, born in Brighton.
Wife Emily aged 35, born in North London
son Kenneth aged 7, born in Blackheath
daughter Gladys M C, aged 5, born in Blackheath
the family have 3 domestic servants living with them.

1901 Census
Macdonald Beaumont (41, solicitor) and Emily Beaumont (38) are stayinging in a boarding house at 19 Margaret st, Marelybone, London.
This may seem odd given they were wealthy, but it must have been a kind of hotel since the other boarders were all 'living off own means' rather than working, and intriguingly there are a couple of Antonini's staying there too - perhaps cousins of Emily.

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1928 record of death:
BEAUMONT Emily of 41 Vicarage Walk, Seaford (wife of MacDonald Beaumont) died 6th september 1928... Effects £15,712 (which is £700,000 to £2.3 million today, depending on how you calculate it) 
Antonini Emily
 
23 Francesco was born to a wealthy Italian family in Genoa, rebelled against them and moved to make his fortune in London where he made his home. He was a linguist speaking 5 languages, he travelled widely as a banker and merchant, including to Brazil, and legend has it made his fortune due to a remembered act of kindness to a friend. He was certainly not short of cash - the family had 8 domestic servants at one point and he left around £160,000 in his will (in todays money it amounts to 13 million or 198 million depending which way you calculate it).

He married twice. Two children were born to his first wife (name unknown), and it's not known whether they divoced or she died. He then met Dinah, our ancestor, who was a widow with 4 children. They had three children together before they got married, and lived in a large house in South London. Dinah died when her dress caught fire at a party, and Francesco then lived a widower for 15 years before dying in 1880.

Family notes about Francesco written by Macdonald Beaumont (a grandson of Francesco and Dinah):

"...Now we will mingle Italian warm blood with Yorkshire and Norman. Grandfather Francesco Manuel Antonini hailed from Genoa, then more a city of palaces than of merchandise. He came of a great Roman Catholic family, brislting with priests and doctrine so much so that he felt a most robust dislike for both, and, in open rebellion, forsook even his military duties to embark for England and a fortune midst the jibes and execrations of his relations. In particular one aunt, to whom he sent a beautiful diamond ring to show his prosperity, though he was really so hard up he could hardly pay for it.

But he was a worker and could speak and write five languages, so he got into Baron Heath's English and foreign Bank, and incidently went to Brazil where he met and befriended a down and out. [note by Kenneth Beaumont: Jackson Kent told me that this down and out was an old Italian friend of Antonini's; that Antonini lent the man £1000]. Years afterwards Antonini met his debtor, now affluent in London, who asked his benefactor whether, in return for the kindness that he had never forgotten, your grandfather would care for a partnership in "Muriettas", then a very great firm. Hence your grandfather made a fortune and retired with it, when the young Muriettas and the Marchese di San Tourey became too fond of speculation and polo for his comfort. the firm failed after the Baring crisis. The Antonini fortune did not do much for the male descendents. Uncle Charles Antonini, a clever surgeon with fine appointments and credentials retired, Uncle Frank, clever as he was, did nothing with his brains.

[note by Kenneth Beaumont: F.M Antonini married twice. By his first marriage were born Charles and Mrs Bedford. His second wife, my grandmother, died as the result of her dress catching fire at a party. Of this marriage there were four children. Maude Elizabeth who married Harrison and then Pike. Emily (who married M.B), Rose Antoinette (who married Hilhouse and then Block) and Francesco Emmanuel (Frank). The Bedfords are the descendants of a daughter of Antonini by his first wife who married E.Bedford..."

source: family history notes of Macdonald Beaumont 1934

footnote: "Baron Heath's English and foreign Bank" must refer to Baron John Benjamin Heath (1790 -1879), who was the director of the Bank of England 1823-1872, and was the son of John Heath, an English merchant of Genoa. The Genoese connection might have helped Antonini, or might be incidental.

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1851 Census record:
Francis W Antonini, age 48, lives at 10 Albert terrace, Islington, on his own. Occupation 'Merchant in the Spanish', born in Italy.

1859 Marriage record:
27th April, at St John, Upper Holloway
Francisco Manuel Antonini marries Dinah Ann Davey.
He is a Batchelor and a gentleman living in Holloway
She is a widow living in Balls Pond [Hackney]
His father Jerome Antonini, gentleman
Her father Robert Bainbridge, gentleman

1861 Census:
Antonini family live in Prospect House, Surbiton Crescent, Kingston Surrey
Francis M Antonini is aged 55, landholder, born in Italy.
Dinah A Antonini is aged 41, born London
Matilda Antonini aged 7, born London
Emily Antonini aged 5, born London
Rose Antonini aged 3, born London
Francis M Antonini aged 6 months, born London

Thee are also 3 older stepdaughters and a stepson with the surname Davey.
And 8 domestic servants (!); cook, upper nurse, under nurse, upper housemaid, under housemaid, laundry maid, kitchen maid, needlewoman.
So Francis Antonini must have been rich

1871 Census:
the family live in Surbiton Park Crescent.
Fransisco M Antonini, aged 67, is a retired Merchant, born in Italy
Charles Antonini, son aged 29, is a surgeon in Kings college
Maude 17, Rose 13 and Frank agd 10 are other children.
6 domestic servants live with them.

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Probate 1880:

18th Nov 1880 will and codicile of Francesco Emmanuelle otherwise known as Francisco Manuel Antonini formerly of the Old Jewry afterwards of Adams Court Old Broad street both in the City of London but late of Prospect House Surbiton Crescent, Surbiton Park, Kingston in the County of Surrey, Gentleman, who died 30th Oct 1880 at Prospect House was proved at the Principal registry by William Bevan and John Passmore the surviving executors.
Personal Estate under £160,000


Death notice:
London Gazette, 23rd Nov 1880:

"Francesco Emmanuelle Antonini otherwise Francisco Manuel Antonini, deceased...Notice is hereby given that all creditors and others having claims against the estate of Francesco Emmanuelle Antonini otherwise Francisco Manuel Antonini, formerly of the Old Jewry, and afterwards of Adam's Court, Old Broad street, both in the City of London, and late of Prospect House, surbiton Crescent, Surbiton Park Kingston, in the county of Surrey, Gentleman (who died on 30th day of October 1880)... are required to send in such particulars of such claims by on or before the 23rd of December 1880, to me, the undersigned, as solicitor for the said executors..."

 
Antonini Francisco Manuel
 
24 Family notes written by Macdonald for his son Kenneth in June 1934.

"...Now we will mingle Italian warm blood with Yorkshire and Norman. Grandfather Francesco Manuel Antonini hailed from Genoa, then more a city of palaces than of merchandise. He came of a great Roman Catholic family, brislting with priests and doctrine so much so that he felt a most robust dislike for both, and, in open rebellion, forsook even his military duties to embark for England and a fortune midst the jibes and execrations of his relations. In particular one aunt, to whom he sent a beautiful diamond ring to show his prosperity, though he was really so hard up he could hardly pay for it.

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Mentioned in his sons marriage record:

1859 Marriage record:
27th April, at St John, Upper Holloway
Francisco Manuel Antonini marries Dinah Ann Davey.
He is a Batchelor and a gentleman living in Holloway
She is a widow living in Balls Pond [Hackney]
His father Jerome Antonini, gentleman
Her father Robert Bainbridge, gentleman

 
Antonini Jerome
 
25 Jane was born and died in Hull. She married John Collings in London, and after their first child was born there they returned to live in Hull, where they had anther 6 children of whom 3 died in childhood.

After John died, she married a surgeon called Michael Tennyson a year later, but was widowed a second time after 9 years. (There is a legal paper below which alludes to the fact that they separated in the same year as his death)

Jane came from a wealthy family, and no doubt her two husband's were similarly well off. The land she passed on to her daughter Mary Collings is detailed under Mary's entry. Below are the legal documents referring to land Jane inherited.

Document source,'ASHMOLE, COLLINGS AND BEATSON FAMILY AND ESTATE RECORDS' in the National Archives:
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/A2A/records.aspx?cat=047-ddx126&cid=-1#-1

terms: a 'messuage' is an old conveyancing term for a dwelling, a 'garth' is an old norse word for an enclosed yard or paddock. A 'boon' is a days work given to a lord for free and a 'toft' is the site of a dwelling, so a boon toft must be some kind of grace favour house?

The way each document is summarised by the National Archives, my understanding is party/parties 1) is giving / selling the property onto party/parties 2)

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Copy will of Jane Tennyson of Hull gentlewoman 2 Nov 1784
Bequests: daughters Mary Beatson, Jane Collings and Elizabeth Bramston Property: farm, 3 messuages (one called the Great House), cottage used by William Mitchinson as an apothecary's shop, and lands in Preston. Messuage, hempgarth and close called Footy Garth in Hedon. Farm and cottage at Ottringham. Lands in Keyingham. Closes in Swine. six and a half acres in Paull Lands in Paull. Farmhouse 'now almost wasted' and lands in Owstwick. Lands in Coniston. Personalty Witnesses: William Iveson, Smithson Greene and Thomas Howson Probate: 7 Jan 1791

Deed of partition relating to land in Hedon, Swine, Paull, Keyingham and Burstwick, 13 Aug 1782
Parties: 1) Michael Tennyson of Preston gentleman and wife Jane; Christopher Wormley of Cawood gentleman and wife Elizabeth 2) John Garforth of Hedon gentleman (Jane Tennyson being the sister and Christopher Wormley the nephew, and heirs of Rosamond Clarke of Hedon widow deceased) Property: Christopher Wormley to have farm with Holme Close, Newland Close and Bottom Close in Swine; 2 messuages, St John's Close or St John's Churchyard, cottage and 2 stables in Hedon; and six and a half acres in Paull Lands in Paull. Jane Tennyson to have Hunger Close and Bottom Close in Swine; 2 messuages in Hedon and six and a half acres in Paull Lands. Jane Tennyson to have specified messuages and lands in Keyingham, copyhold of the manor of Burstwick. Christopher Wormley to have specified lands in Keyingham, copyhold of the manor of Burstwick

Copy settlement relating to separation of Michael and Jane Tennyson 5 Apr 1769
Parties: 1) Michael Tennyson of Preston surgeon and apothecary and wife Jane (widow of John Collings) 2) John Storr of Owstwick gentleman James Shutt of Humbleton and John Fewson of Newton Garth gentlemen, Marmaduke Brown of Ganstead and William Iveson of Hedon gentlemen Property: farm in Owstwick. Farm in Ottringham. Third part of messuage and lands in Coniston. Copyhold houses and lands in Preston. Plate, pictures, lines and furniture Recites their marriage settlement (1-2 Feb 1760)

Mortgage for £1200 by surrender and admission 2 Apr 1755
Parties: 1) Jane Collings widow 2) John Grimston of Kilnwick esquire Property: messuage, cottage and specified lands in Preston

Mortgage for £1200 by way of surrender and admission relating to manor court of Burstwick 16 Nov 1754
Parties: 1) Jane Collings widow 2) John Grimston of Kilnwick esquire Property: : messuage, cottage and specified lands in Preston

Surrender and admission relating to manor court of Burstwick 20 May 1747
Parties: 1) Robert Lister of Preston yeoman and wife Mary 2) John Collings and wife Jane Property: parcel of a close in Kirkam in Preston

Surrender and admission relating to manor court of Burstwick 1 Apr 1747
Parties: 1) John Collings and wife Jane, Reverend John Clark and wife Rosamond, and Margaret Wormley widow 2) John and Jane Collings Property: specified lands in Preston

Deed of partition of estates of William Ashmole 24 Nov 1746
Parties: 1)Margaret Wormley of Hull widow; Reverend John Clarke and wife Rosamond and John Collings and wife Jane 2) Ralph Featherston Property: specified messuages and lands in Beverley, to use of Margaret Wormley Specified messuages and lands in Hedon and Swine and 2 closes in Beverley to use of Rosamond Clarke, specified closes in Hornsea or Hornsea Burton to use of Jane and John Clarke Witnesses: R Northan and Richard Beatniffe

Deed of partition relating to the estate of John Cockerell 20 Nov 1736
Parties: 1) Reverend John Clarke junior and wife Rosamond; John Collings esquire and wife Jane, all of Hull (Rosamond Clarke and John Clarke being daughters of William Ashmole and nieces and heirs of John Cockrell) 2) Ralph Featherston of Beverley gentleman Property: estates of John Cockerell in Ottringham and Owstwick to uses of Jane and John Cockerell. His estates in Hedon, Ryhill, Camerton, Thorngumbald, Paull, Stoneferry and East Newton to uses of Ralph Featherston Witnesses: R Northan and Richard Beatniffe

Surrender and admission relating to land in Preston 19 Nov 1746
Parties: 1) John Croft gentleman, Thomas Roberts gentleman, John Collings and wife Jane, Reverend John Clark and wife Rosamond, and Margaret Wormley widow 2) John Collings and wife Jane Property: specified lands in Preston

Common recovery and subsequent admission relating to manor court of Burstwick 19 Nov 1746
Parties: 1) John Collings esquire and wife Jane 2)Reverend John Clarke and wife Rosamond, and Margaret Wormley widow all of Hull Property: specified lands in Preston

Admission relating to manor court of Burstwick 26 Jun 1745
Refers to Margaret Wormsley widow, Rosamond Ashmole spinster and Jane wife of John Collings, daughters and heirs of William Ashmole of Hull gentleman Property: specified lands, a messuage, a cottage, 2 Boon Tofts, barn and garth in Preston

Admission relating to manor court of Burstwick 26 Jun 1745
Refers to Margaret Wormsley widow, Rosamond Ashmole spinster and Jane wife of John Collings, daughters and heirs of William Ashmole of Hull gentleman Property: messuage, orchard, little close and a Boon Toft, cottage near Oaktree Hill; and messuage in Kirkham, all in Preston

This last document gives a summary of the lands held by Jane Ashmole and her husband John Collings' families:

Abstract of deeds relating to the Collings and Ashmole families 1738-1750
Property: George Inn, Cloth Hall and parcel called Coneygarth (having a passage into Low Gate) on west side of High Street, and adjoining garth called the Town's Yard in Lowgate in Hull. Messuage, garth and orchard in Pindfold Street in Howden. Messuage and garth in Brig-Gate in Howden. Messuages, shops and closes in Beverley. Messuages and closes in Hedon. Farm and 6 closes in Swine. Messuage in Town Street in Anlaby with horsegates in the Furth, South Holmes and North Holmes. Cottage and wind-corn-mill in West Field in Anlaby. Messuage in High Street in Hull. Closes called Maiden Hills (Wold Ings West and Myton Carr East); a little close; and 200 sheepgates in Myton Carr all in Myton. Messuage; 2 tenements nearby in Blockhouse Lane; and 2 closes all in Sutton. Well Close, close adjoining Burton Green and 3 beastgates in Burton Green in Hornsea Burton. Farm and 100 acres in Owstwick. Farm and 52 acres in Hornsea Burton

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In the 18th century Hull was, increasingly, an outlet for manufactured goods from the fast growing towns of Yorkshire. Goods like tools and cutlery were exported. Raw materials for the industrial towns were imported into Hull. One import was iron from Sweden and Russia. Materials for shipbuilding such as timber, hemp, pitch and flax were also imported. Exports included grain and other foodstuffs. There were many whalers operating from Hull. Whales were hunted for their blubber, which was melted to make oil and for whalebone.

However the port became congested so a dock was built where ships could load and unload cargoes. It opened in 1778 on the site of Queens Gardens. Hull was not a manufacturing centre in the 18th century. The only large-scale industry was shipbuilding. However there was also an industry grinding rapeseed. They were ground by windmills or horse mills. The oil was used in making paint and soap. There was also some sugar refining in Hull.

Hull grew very rapidly in the 18th century. The population grew from around 7,500 in 1700 to around 22,000 in 1800.

source: http://www.localhistories.org/hull.html 
Ashmole Jane
 
26 he was born at sea, hence his middle name! Atlantic Rev Henry
 
27 Dinah was born in London and married her first husband, William Davey aged around 21. She had 4 children by him while living in Cambridgeshire before she was widowed aged 30. She must have had some family money because she was recorded as being an 'annuitant' in the 1851 census.
She then must have moved to London where she met Francesco and they had 3 children out of wedlock before marrying in 1859, when she was about 39.
Francesco was a wealthy businessman, who had rebelled the conservative catholic nature of his family in Genoa which is why it is not so surprising that they had an unconventional co-habitation before marriage. Dinah and Francesco lived in a large family house in south London, with Dinah no doubt staying at home raising her 8 children, until her untimely death in 1865, aged about 45, when her dress caught fire at a party, according to her great grandson.

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1841 Dinah married William Davey in Caxton, Cambridgeshire. They had 4 children before William died. There is a record for a William Davey dying in Louth, Cambs. in Jan-Mar 1850 which corresponds to where Dinah was living as a widow in 1851.
As you can see from the photo of the certificate above, one of the witnesses was Elizabeth Bainbridge - could she have been Dinah's mother? So far no clue has been found as to her mothers name.

1851 census
Dinah was recorded as Daniela Ann Davey, a widow aged 29, occupation 'annuitant' (so independantly wealthy perhaps), born London.
with her were her 3 daughters and a son, the youngest only 1 so her husband must have recently died. 3 of the children were born in Barrington, Cambs. The family were living in Louth, Linconshire.
Isabella 7, William 5, Lucy 4, Francis 1.

Marriage Record 1859:
Francesco Manuel Antonini married Dinah Anne Davey on April 27th 1859, he is a batchelor and Gentleman living in Holloway, she is a Widow living on Balls Pond Rd [Hackney]. They got married at St John's Church, Upper Holloway. Francesco's father is Jerome Antonini, Gentleman, and Dinah's is Robert Bainbridge, Gentleman.

(This is 3 years after Emily is born so she was born out of wedlock)

1861 Census:
Antonini family live in Prospect House, Surbiton Crescent, Kingston Surrey
Francis M Antonini is aged 55, landholder, born in Italy.
Dinah A Antonini is aged 41, born London
Matilda Antonini aged 7, born London
Emily Antonini aged 5, born London
Rose Antonini aged 3, born London
Francis M Antonini aged 6 months, born London
There are also 3 older stepdaughters and a stepson with the surname Davey: Isabella Davey, stepdaughter age 17; William Davey, stepson age 15; Lucy Davey, stepdaughter age 13.
And 8 domestic servants (!); cook, upper nurse, under nurse, upper housemaid, under housemaid, laundry maid, kitchen maid, housekeeper (?).
So Francis Antonini must have been rich

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Death record 1865, Kingston, London.
According to her grandson Kenneth Beaumont's family notes, Dinah died when her dress caught fire at a party (!). 
Bainbridge Dinah Ann
 
28 or possible Albert instead of Robert, name given on daughters marriage record Bainbridge Robert
 
29 1809 Marriage record
Mark Barnes gets married to Ann Baker on 3rd Aug 1809, at Dinton Teffont Magna.
- this reinforces link with daughter Sarah who married William Hampton as Sarah B Barnes, and that B stood for Baker in her Probate and her husband William's probate records
- Tefont Magna is a 'chapelry' (ecclesiastical sub division) of Dinton, which is under 2 miles away. The 13th century church there is called St Edwards.

1841 Census record
Ann Barnes age 50, born Wiltshire, is living with her carpenter husband Mark Barnes and three children in Dinton, Wiltshire. 
Baker Ann
 
30  Barlow Cuthbert
 
31 This is a birth note

Now adding more to this note. 
Barlow Cuthbert
 
32 from County Galway, Ireland Barlow James
 
33 Cuthbert Barlow led an extraordinarily exciting and dangerous life in the British army. His life is summarised thus:

Youngest son, first Communion 7/6/1810
Occupation: Army
Entered the Royal Navy at the age of ten as a Midshipman (Officer Cadet) under the command of Sir Peter Parker of HMS Weazel.
Whilst engaged with a Spanish Brig of War off Cadiz he was wounded by musket ball through the leg and cutlass wound in the shoulder.He recovered after somewhile in Haslar Hospital.
He entered the Army on 7th June 1810 at the age of 14.
Served in Wellington's Peninsular Campaign from 1810-1812 with 2nd battalion 66th Regiment.
Served in Candian War (Ceylon) in 1814 as Adjutant.
Joined 17th Foot in Bengal and served through the Goorkahar and Nepaul 1815.
Was engaged at the Battle of Jubblepore in 1817, served through the Mahratta War 1817-1818.
Returned with Regiment as Acting Adjutant in 1823.
Married Mary Ann Lambert 6/4/1824 in Dublin (Church of Ireland)
Was appointed Paymaster of the 54th Regiment in India 1828 until the Regiment returned to England.
Joined 57th Reg.of Foot in1840, transferred to the 10th Reg. of Foot in Calcutta 1843.
Was present at Meerat in the Punjaub 1845.
Presented with medal at the Battle of Sobraon.
Served with the 9th Lancers at the Passage of the Chenab, Ragmugger, hillianwallah and Goojerat.
Presented with Medal and Clasps in the Sutley Campaign.
Having fought in 38 engagements in all and retired from the Army with the rank of Major.

source: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~barlow/ireland/families/jamesofrosmilan11.htm

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National Archiaves record:

Name: Cuthbert Barlow. Rank: Ensign to Pay Master. Regiments: 66th Regiment; 17th Regiment; 54th Foot; 57th Foot; 10th Foot; 9th Lancers; 22nd Foot. Dates of Service: 1810-1852. Born: 1795.

source: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/Catalogue/displaycataloguedetails.asp?CATID=-7536588&CATLN=7&accessmethod=5

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1861 Census Record:
Jersey, Channel Islands.
Cuthbert Barlow, age 65, Major half Pay, born Ireland, lives with Mary his wife, age 54, born Ireland, at No.64 Rouge Boullon, St Helier, Jersey.
With them live daughters Ismena Barlow, 15, born India, Alice Diane Barlow, age 24, born India, grandaughters Mary Cassidy 15, born Iralnd, Henrietta Cassidy, 12 born Ireland, and grandson John(?) age 7 born Ireland.
 
Barlow Maj. Cuthbert
 
34 Mary was born in Madras, India, to Irish parents where her father was an adventurous soldier in the British army (he survived 38 battles). She was the eldest of 8 children.
Mary married an English surgeon, Charles, who was working in Lahore, 18 years her senior. They had 4 children in India, lived through the Indian Mutiny, and would have moved in circles with the shakers and players since her husband became a Sanitory commissioner and then private secretary to the Viceroy of India.
They retired to England, living in Somerset and Hastings. After her husband died she spent the last 8 years of her life living in Bath.

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Mary's father Maj Cuthbert Barlow, who led a very exciting military life was posted to India in 1828 which would explain Mary being born there. Her father fought in various campaigns there till at least 1846, and since there is no record yet of her returning to her native Ireland, Mary must have grown up in India and met her doctor husband there.

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1871 Census:
Charles Hathaway, aged 54, Physician not practising, graduated at Aberdeen, (born Bromley Kent) lives with Mary C Hathaway, age 37 (born India) at Barnard House, Pulteney Rd, Bathwick, Somerset. Also living there:
Amy F Hathaway, 17
Mary K Hathaway, 13
Ethel L Hathaway, 9
Charles Hathaway, 11
Living with them are a governess and four domestic servants.

1881 Census:
Charles Hathaway, aged 64, Physician (born Bromley Kent)lives with Mary C Hathaway, age 46 (born Madras India, British subject) at No.1 Barnard House, Bathwick, Somerset.
Also living there Mary K Hathaway age 22 (born Lahore), and Ethel L Hathaway age 19 (born Simla).
Three domestic servants also live with them.

1901 Census:
Charles Hathaway, aged 84, MD Indian MEdical Service retired (born Bromley, Kent) lives with Mary C Hathaway, aged 66 (born Frichinopoli? India), at No.11 Edward Rd, St Mary Magdelene, Hastings.
They have three domestic servants living with them.

1911 Census:
Mary Cecilia Hathaway, age 76, mother-in-law, widow, born Trinchinopoly India, lives with her daughter Mary Kathleen Hensley @ 11 Lansdown Crescent, Bath.
Also living in the large (17 room) house are Mary's husband Egerton Hensley, clergyman, son Egerton Henry aged 18, and 4 domestic servants, including a 'sick nurse' who presumably was for Mary who died seven months after the Census.

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Probate record 1911:
HATHAWAY Mary Cecilia of 11 Lansdowne Crescent, Bath, widow, died 21 November 1911. Probate London 13th December to Amy Florence Grant, widow, and Mary Kathleen Hensley (wife of reverend egerton John Hensley). Effects £2067  
Barlow Mary Cecilia
 
35 Mark Barnes was a Carpenter aged 55 in the village of Dinton, Wiltshire, according to the 1841 Census. There were about 5 Barnes families in Dinton in this census, including another carpenter called Roger (aged 50) who was quite probably his brother.

1809 Marriage record
Mark Barnes gets married to Ann Baker on 3rd Aug 1809, at Dinton Teffont Magna.
- this reinforces link with daughter Sarah who married William Hampton as Sarah B Barnes, and that B stood for Baker in her Probate and her husband William's probate records
- Teffont Magna is a 'chapelry' (ecclesiastical sub division) of Dinton, which is under 2 miles away. The 13th century church there is called St Edwards. 
Barnes Mark
 
36 Sarah was a country lass who grew up in a small village in Wiltshire. She got married aged 22 to Abel, a servant, and they had 2 children in Wiltshire before moving to Hampshire where Abel worked as a groom, and then on to London where Abel ran a fleet of cabs.
the only job she is listed as having is 'washerwoman' as well as grooms wife in 1861.
The fact that their children became a house maid, school mistress and a ships captain shows that they are a good example of a couple who changed their fortunes from humble rural beginnings.

++++++

Jul-Sept 1847 Marriage record for Abel Hampton and Sarah B Barnes, at St Mary in Dinton.
http://www.wiltshirebmd.org.uk/cgi/marrind.cgi

There are 3 girls called Sarah Barnes living in Dinton in the 1841 Census.
The first aged 12, but she would have been born in 1829 - this Sarah Barnes had as parents William Barnes aged 60, a 'game keeper' born in Wiltshire and mother Sarah aged 50 not born in Wiltshire. The second Sarah Barnes is aged 14, so born 1827, had as father Roger Barnes age 50 Carpenter and mother Margaret age 50, both born in Wiltshire. The third Sarah Barnes is age 15, so born in 1826, and has father Mark Barnes aged 55 Carpenter, and mother Ann, both born in Wiltshire.

+++++++

1851 Census:
'Able' Hampton is recorded as living 'Under the Hill' at Alderbury in Wiltshire, aged 20. He's a servant, born in Chevrell Magna in Wiltshire, and is married to Sarah Hampton.
Sarah is aged 26 and comes from Dinton in Wiltshire.
There is a daughter called Sarah Ann Hampton, aged 2, born in Farley, Wiltshire, and a son called William Watts Hampton, aged 1, also born in Farley, Wiltshire.

1861 Census:
Abel Hampton is head of household at a Cottage in Dean, Hampshire, aged 38. He is a groom.
His wife Sarah B Hampton is aged 36, is a Groom's wife and Washerwoman.
Daughter Sarah A Hampton is 12 yrs old, and William W Hampton is aged 11 and is an Under Groom.
A Daughter called Jane D Hampton is aged 9.

1871 Census: Abel Hampton, aged 48, is a 'Cab Proprietor', living at 15 St Johns Villas, Colney Hatch, Edmonton, Middlesex.
His wife Sarah B Hampton is aged 46.
Daughter Sarah A Hampton is a Housemaid aged 22.
William W Hampton is a son aged 21 and a Ships Steward.
Daughter Jane D Hampton aged 19 is a school mistress.

1873 Abel Hampton Will
8th Aug: Effects under £200
Administration of the effects of Abel Hampton, late of 15 St John's Villas, New Southgate in the county of Middlesex. Fly Proprietor who died on the High Rd between Wood Green and Colney Hatch in the said County was granted at the Principal registry to Sarah Baker Hampton of 15 St John's villas Widow the relict.

1881 Census:
Sarah B. Hampton, aged 56, living in St Mary's Rd, Gt Bowden, Leicestershire.
Mother-in-law of Robert Cotton and Jane D Cotton (daughter)

+++++++

1884 death registered
Sarah Baker Hampton, Market Harborough, Leicestershire aged 59. 
Barnes Sarah Baker
 
37 from Horbury, Yorks. Beatson John, (senior)
 
38 John was an eminent farmer in the area according to his obituary in the Leeds Intelligencer, 23 Mar 1767.

Copy of the probate of John Beatson of Cottingley Hall is held in the Sheffield Archives: p. Leeds SY319/Z/7/1 1767

He must have been at Cottingley Hall by April 4th 1738 because tha's when we get the following advertisement in the Leeds Mercury:

"To be sold Altogether and Speedily, at Cottingley near Leeds, a Parcel of Timber Trees with the Bark, Ash and other Trees proper for Husbandry, Geer &c., decay'd Trees proper for Cordwood, and a fine Spring wood called Hodgson other Cottingley Spring, consisting of about 24 acres.
The whole numbered and set out as they are to be disposed off and may be view'd by inquiring of Mr. John Beatson, at Cottingley Hall. For the Price and other Particulars enquire of Mr. Alan Johnson, Attorney at Law in Wakefield."

source: ‘The publications of the Thoresby Society’ 1919, http://www.archive.org/stream/thoresbypt126thoruoft/thoresbypt126thoruoft_djvu.txt

Cottingly Hall was long ago pulled down, it's now an area of Leeds 
Beatson John, (junior)
 
39 they had three children. Beatson John, (junior)
 
40 Mary was christened in Salt House Lane chapel, Kingston upon Hull. This must have been by her father the Rev John Beatson who was the preacher there. She was married twice, first to Wilfred Burnham with whom she had 2 children, and after wilfred died she married George Blenkin and had another 4 children.
George died in 1837, and Mary then lived for another 33 years as a widow. She lived most of her life in Hull, before moving to Boston in Lincolnshire in old age. George being a seed merchant in the thriving port of Hull, the family would have lived above the premises George worked from which was No.67 the High Street, Hull. Probably because of George's work, when he died she must have been left some money because she is described as a 'landed proprietor' in the 1851 census.

+++++

1841 Census:
Mary Blenkin, age 55, is living in Savile st, Sculcoates, Kingston-upon-Hull. With her lives Frederick Blenkin age 15, Winifreda Dunning age 25, and William Dunning age 3. A House Servant also lives with them.
(There is short-hand after Mary and Winefreda's names which probably stands for living on independent means)

1851 Census:
Mary Blenkin, age 69, widow and head of family, lives at 4 Savile st, Sculcoates, Kingston-upon-Hull. Occupation: 'Landed Proprietor', and she was born in Hull, Yorks.
with her is living William Dunning, grandson, age 13, and a cook and a housemaid.

1861 Census:
Mary Blenkin, age 79, widow, born Hull Yorkshire, lives in London rd, Skirbeck Quarter, Boston, Lincolnshire.
She's living with her daughter Mrs W B Dunning, who is also a widow, and two domestic servants.

++++++

There is an interesting legal case in 1820 which involves George and Mary and the custody of some children before the High Court:
'Order for Habeas Corpus for bringing up Children on application of Father.
[The order was made on motion.]
His Lordship doth order that a writ of Habeas Corpus do issue, directing the said defendants George Blenkin and Mary his wife to bring into this Court the plaintiffs Mary Lyons, Frances Lyons and Jane Beatson Lyons the infant children of the said John Lyons, at the sitting of this Court, at Westminster Hall, on the 10th of February next. Lyons v. Blenkin. L. C. 15th January, 1820. Reg. Lib. B. 1819. fol. 208. S.C. Jac. 247.
Writ of Habeas Corpus in the above case.
George the Third &c.'To George Blenkin and Mary his wife greeting. We command you, that you do on Thursday, the 15th day of February next, bring before us in our Court of Chancery, at the sitting thereof at Westminster Hall, the bodies of Mary Lyons, Frances Lyons, and Jane Beatson Lyons, or by whatsoever name or addition they are known or called, who are detained in your custody, to perform and abide such order as our said Court shall make in their behalf. And hereof fail not, and bring this writ with you. Witness ourself, at Westminster, the 29th day of January, in the 60th year of our reign. [From a MS. of Mr. Jacob.]
The Return to the above Writ. The within named George Blenkin and Mary his wife do hereby certify to the Right Honourable the Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, that the within-named plaintiffs Mary Lyons, Frances Lyons, and Jane Beatson Lyons, are detained by and are under the protection of the said Mary Blenkin, in the parish of Sculcoates in the county of York, for the purpose of their being educated and maintained by her as their guardian, under the will of their grand-mother Mary Beatson deceased, and according to the trusts and directions for those purposes contained in the said will. Dated the 9th of February, 1820. (From a MS. of Mr. Jacob.) S. C. Lyons v. Blenkin, supra.

source: Forms of decrees in equity: and of orders connected with them, with practical notes? by Sir Henry Wilmot Seton. http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=9akDAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA282&lpg=PA282&dq=George+Beatson+Blenkin&source=bl&ots=FGDMoAOQ_d&sig=x5QEV_fzsM01mdk6rdziqktxXC4&hl=en&sa=X&ei=kagcT4aLEYH28QPF18DRCQ&ved=0CCgQ6AEwAjgK#v=onepage&q=George%20Beatson%20Blenkin&f=false

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Probate record 1870:
The will of Mary Blenkin, formerly of savile street in the Parish of Sculcoates, in the borough of Kingston-upon-Hull, but late of Skirbeck Quarter, Boston, in the County of Lincoln. Widow, deceased who died 20th June 1870 at Boston aforesaid was proved at Lincoln by the oaths of the Reverend Frederick Beatson Blenkin of the city of Lincoln the son, and Wilfreda Beatson Dunning of Skirbeck Quarter, aforesaid widow, the daughter, the executors.
Effects under £450. 
Beatson Mary
 
41 Rev John was brought up in the Church of England, but became a Dissenter against his family's wishes and variously practised as a Calvinist, a Baptist, and an Evangelical preacher.

He was married twice, with one child by his first marriage and 3 by his second.

He helped set up the Hull Subscription library, acting as the president of the committee that ran it, and wrote various religious treatise some of which still survive.

Here is his preface to a book called 'The Divine right of a Christian to Freedom of enquiry and practice in religious matters' an essay on religious freedom, so you can hear his own voice:

"Though the title of this little piece be The divine right of a Christian, the author would be no means insinuate that men in general, have not a right to judge and act for themselves, in whatever relates to the affairs of religion. Quite the revers. For he is fully persuaded, that absolute liberty in those matters, is a right essential to our nature as reasonable creatures, subject to the universal Sovereign and Judge, a right which every individual holds, independently of all others, and for the abuse of which (so far as that abuse is merely personal) he is accountable only to God..."

+++++++

The second edition of his Devine Right essay (mentioned above) published in Hull 1799, a brief memoir of his life. The Memoir is by J. Lyons, his successor at the Salthouse I think, and dated: Hull, 10th October, 1799. Having got hold of a copy, what follows is a precis of this memoir...

'John Beatson was born at Cottingly Hall near Beeston, in the parish of Leeds, on 31st March 1743. His father was a respectable farmer, and his Mother descended from a family of considerable repute in the West-Riding of Yorkshire.

In an early period of his life he was placed in the Grammar school in Leeds...and afterwards he remained at home, improving his mind under the tuition of a clergyman, until he was eighteen years of age.

By birth and education Mr Beatson was a member of the Church of England, but, like many others, when he came to riper years, his enquiries were stronger than the strong holds of hereditary religion. His piety; his steady attendance on the various branches of social worship, his sobriety and other ameniable qualities, soon attracted the notice of Mr Edwards, Minister of the Independent Congregation at White-chapel in Leeds, and he was admitted a member of the Society at White-Chapel.

Mr Beatson's relations now began to be seriously alarmed at his conduct, probably considering his connection with Dissenters as disgraceful to the family. His determination drew upon him the displeasure of his father, who, finding him unmoved by argument or entreaty, threaten him with dis-inheritance, if he still continued to adhere to his notions of non-conformity. How harsh and unjustifiable is the conduct of parents, who, from their fond attachment to their own peculiarities, not only forbid the expansion of the minds of their children, but also punish with severity their honest avowal of truth! The threats of Mr Beatson's father, however were not put into execution.

Mr Beatson's talents as a preacher, and his zeal in the good cause in which he had embarked, soon rendered him conspicuous. He was publicly baptised at Bradford by Mr Crabtree, the Pastor of the Baptist Church at that place, on the 25th Dec 1767, and continued in that neighbourhood preaching occassionally, until the close of the following year, when he accepted of an invitation from the Baptist Church and congregation at Sutton in Craven, and was shortly after unanimously chosen to be their pastor.

He remained there for 2 years then moved to Hull in 1771 where he spent the rest of his life. He found the Salt-House lane congregation in some dissarray, having dismissed their last pastor and some elders, and the remainder being divided in their religious principles. 'Some of them were in the popular sense of the term Arminians, and others were zealous advocates for the doctrine of Calvinism, nor were they much disposed to mutual forebearance.

Mt Beatson was a Calvinist, and his methos of preaching for some years after he came to Hull was more doctrinal than at a more advanced period of his life. His labours were soon crowned with success; his congregation gradually increased; the people of his care became more united, and in all his attitudes, preaching and deportment, he was evidently doing the work of the evangelist.

He published "Divine Philanthropy", a poetical essay in blank verse, full of the grateful reflections of a pious mind on the work of redemption. But Mr Beaston was not born a poet, and of this he seems afterwards to have been sufficiently sensible, for he never made a second attempt at verse of any kind. Ignorance, he considered as the parent of vice and misery; and therefore he rejoiced in everything that had a tendancy towards his general dissatisfaction of knowledge.

With these views and with a laudable zeal, he engaged with a few others to promote the establishment of the HULL SUBSCRIPTION LIBRARY in the year 1775; and was for many years president of the committee.

Religious liberty was a subject that always lay near his heart. Convinced that an unrestrained, impartial and constant examination of the word of God, was the only anecdote against the unscurpulous impositions of usurped authority; the damnatory clauses of human creeds, and the bitter invectives of angry controverialists, he published in the year 1779 the following Treatise, wielding the sword of the spirit against every species of intolerance, in defnece of the inalianable rights and priveleges of the christian [the book to which this is the preface].

Besides this, he published two single sermons - one in 1778 on the 'Duty and interest of men as members of civili society' and the other on 'the slave trade' in 1789.

In the year 1794 he suffered a 'violent nervous complaint, which had been increasing for several years, and which had greatly injured his constitution' and he withrew from public speaking.

Mr John Beatson was a man of solid sense, unaffected manners, and universal integrity. A valuable friend, a pleasing companion, and a useful member of society.

The last time I saw him, he took me by the hand and said, "You see here, only the remains of John Beatson. With respect to the Churches of Christ on earth, I can do nothing not but wish - and my best wishes are with you. I know in whom I have believed, and that he is able to heep that which I have committed unto him" - He would have repeated the remaining part of the passage, but his strength failed him. On the day following, the 24th of April 1798, he recieved his dismission from this vale of tears, in the 55th year of his age. His remains were interred at Preston.

Mr Beatson was twice married. His first wife died the 3rd January 1774, in the thirty second year of her age, by whom he had one daughter, who is still living. He left a widow and three more children.'

+++++++

John Beatson also published ' Complete collection of all the tunes sung by the different congregations in Hull: To which is prefixed, An introduction to the art of psalmody.'

All three of his published sermons are available to buy online should you wish to read them, because 'Gale Eighteenth Century Collections Online' has recently been re-publishing them.

++++++

In Sept 1785 Rev John and Mary are recorded as carrying out a 'Lease and Release' transfer of land title to William Roebuck a clothier of 'in consideration of £440, of a messuage called Briery House als. Briery Field Head als. Briery Busk, standing on Hunshelf Bank, with closes known as Laith Croft, Well Croft, Long Lands, Middle Field, Whitehouse Ing, Nether Field and 3 parcels of woody ground with 4 beastgates in the town fields and West Ings of Hunshelf.' (source: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/A2A/records.aspx?cat=199-sy319z&cid=-1#-1)

Which shows that if that was their land title, they were pretty wealthy.
 
Beatson Rev John
 
42 1861 census:
Beaumont family live at The Grove, Highgate (which seems to be divided between different large families).
James Beaumont is head of the family aged 52, a solicitor, born in Hackney.
Eliza Charlotte his wife is aged 44, born in Vauxhall.
son William is 19, an articled clerk to a solicitor, born in Highgate
Mary Ann, daughter aged 17, also born in Highgate
Constance, daughter aged 14, born Highgate
Fanny aged 12, daughter, born Highgate
Ellen, 11, daughter, born Highgate
Emma Kate, aged 9, born in Brighton
Charles George, aged 6, born in Brighton
MacDonald, aged 3, born in Brighton
And they have 4 servants living with them 
Beaumont Charles George
 
43 1861 census:
Beaumont family live at The Grove, Highgate (which seems to be divided between different large families).
James Beaumont is head of the family aged 52, a solicitor, born in Hackney.
Eliza Charlotte his wife is aged 44, born in Vauxhall.
son William is 19, an articled clerk to a solicitor, born in Highgate
Mary Ann, daughter aged 17, also born in Highgate
Constance, daughter aged 14, born Highgate
Fanny aged 12, daughter, born Highgate
Ellen, 11, daughter, born Highgate
Emma Kate, aged 9, born in Brighton
Charles George, aged 6, born in Brighton
MacDonald, aged 3, born in Brighton
And they have 4 servants living with them 
Beaumont Constance
 
44 ?Very general regret will be felt in Lincoln's Inn and the Chancery Courts at the death, which occurred in London yesterday, of Mr. Edward Beaumont, one of the oldest practising barristers, who had for long been recognized as one of the most learned and capable lawyers in equity and conveyancing matters.
Edward Beaumont was the second son of James Beaumont, a London solicitor, and was born in 1845. He was educated at Highgate School and at St. John's College, Cambridge, where he was a Wrangler, and he was called to the Bar by Lincoln's Inn. of which he was subsequently elected a Bencher, in 1870. He soon acquired an extensive practice, which he retained until his death. In consequence of the large amount of business which passed through his chambers, his pupil room in time became one of the most popular in Lincoln's Inn, and the list of men who subsequently acquired distinction in the profession and elsewhere is a remarkable one. It includes Lord Buckmaster, Mr. Justice Romer. Lord Finlay, Sir Harold Morris, K.C., Mr. Colam, K.C., Sir Edward Chamier, Sir Edgar Bonham-Carter, Sir William Brunyate, Sir Malcolm McIlwraith, Lord Remnant, Sir Samuel Roberts, and Lord Cushendun. Some years ago a large gathering of his former pupils testified to the affection and respect in which he was held by giving him a dinner, at which Lord Buckmaster presided.
For more than half a century Edward Beaumont undoubtedly had one of the best equity and conveyancing practices in Lincoln's Inn, and there were probably few of the great firms of family solicitors whom at one time or another he had not numbered among his professional clients. About 1902 he was appointed Junior Counsel to the Attorney-General in charity matters. Whether at the critical stage of his career he did not fail to follow the right road of taking silk, which would probably have led to the Bench, may be a matter for conjecture; but, however this may be, it is certain that in his day no counsel practising in the Chancery Courts, whether leader or junior, ever attained a higher reputation for learning, integrity, and geniality than did Edward Beaumont. To the Judges who had trusted him ; to clients who had relied on him ; and to generations of pupils whom he had launched upon successful careers, the news of his death will bring a sense of real personal loss. He was a prominent Freemason and a member of the Court of the Cutlers' Company.
Edward Beaumont married Elizabeth Helen, eldest daughter of John Lawrence Tatham, the well-known conveyancer. She died in 1912. A son, Mr. John W. F. Beaumont, K.C., who was appointed Chief Justice of Bombay last week, and a daughter survive him. [obituary, The Times]
The Times, obituary, 30 Apr 1930.
source: http://www.saxonlodge.net/getperson.php?personID=I1164&tree=Tatham#cite7 
Beaumont Edward
 
45 1861 census:
Beaumont family live at The Grove, Highgate (which seems to be divided between different large families).
James Beaumont is head of the family aged 52, a solicitor, born in Hackney.
Eliza Charlotte his wife is aged 44, born in Vauxhall.
son William is 19, an articled clerk to a solicitor, born in Highgate
Mary Ann, daughter aged 17, also born in Highgate
Constance, daughter aged 14, born Highgate
Fanny aged 12, daughter, born Highgate
Ellen, 11, daughter, born Highgate
Emma Kate, aged 9, born in Brighton
Charles George, aged 6, born in Brighton
MacDonald, aged 3, born in Brighton
And they have 4 servants living with them 
Beaumont Ellen Torlesse
 
46 1861 census:
Beaumont family live at The Grove, Highgate (which seems to be divided between different large families).
James Beaumont is head of the family aged 52, a solicitor, born in Hackney.
Eliza Charlotte his wife is aged 44, born in Vauxhall.
son William is 19, an articled clerk to a solicitor, born in Highgate
Mary Ann, daughter aged 17, also born in Highgate
Constance, daughter aged 14, born Highgate
Fanny aged 12, daughter, born Highgate
Ellen, 11, daughter, born Highgate
Emma Kate, aged 9, born in Brighton
Charles George, aged 6, born in Brighton
MacDonald, aged 3, born in Brighton
And they have 4 servants living with them 
Beaumont Emma Kate
 
47 1861 census:
Beaumont family live at The Grove, Highgate (which seems to be divided between different large families).
James Beaumont is head of the family aged 52, a solicitor, born in Hackney.
Eliza Charlotte his wife is aged 44, born in Vauxhall.
son William is 19, an articled clerk to a solicitor, born in Highgate
Mary Ann, daughter aged 17, also born in Highgate
Constance, daughter aged 14, born Highgate
Fanny aged 12, daughter, born Highgate
Ellen, 11, daughter, born Highgate
Emma Kate, aged 9, born in Brighton
Charles George, aged 6, born in Brighton
MacDonald, aged 3, born in Brighton
And they have 4 servants living with them 
Beaumont Fanny Emmeline
 
48 Gladys was the daughter of a successful lawyer and a half Italian mother, both Londoners. She and her elder brother would have had a comfortable upbringing since both her parents were well-off.
At some point she met her husband George, who was 10 years her senior, and married him in 1909 when she was 23. He was by this time a decorated soldier in India.
She then would have followed him out to India where he served until at least 1917.

++++++
1886 Birth registered in Woolwich, London

1891 census:
Family live at No.8 Morden rd in Kidbrooke.
Father McDonald Beaumont is a solicitor aged 33, born in Brighton.
Wife Emily aged 35, born in North London
son Kenneth aged 7, born in Blackheath
daughter Gladys M C, aged 5, born in Blackheath
the family have 3 domestic servants living with them.

1901 Census:
Gladys Beaumont, age 15, born Blackheath, is a pupil boarder at Coldicote Towers Ladies School, Coldicote, in Aldenham, Hertfordshire, along with 68 other girls.

+++++++

Record of death 1965:
Grant, Gladys M C, age 73, Cuckfield, Sussex
 
Beaumont Gladys Maud Constance
 
49 James was a Londoner born and bred in Hackney. He became a solicitor, and a successful one at that, given that he left £50,000 in his will. He joined the Company of Cutlers following in the footsteps of his grandfather. Aged 32 he married Eliza (daughter of a London 'gentleman') and they had 9 children together. Described by his son as "a most courtly gentleman, ugly but with classic features", he lived with his family in north London before moving south of the river where he died aged 71.

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Family notes written by Macdonald for his son Kenneth in June 1934.

"...Your grandfather James Beaumont was originally partner in the firm known as Richardson Sadler & Co. of Golden Square. Old Richardson was in advance of his day, in that in retirement he elected to live in Paris, to avoid his most amusing, scurrilous, society wife, who resided in Bruton street. She had a great, and I should think unpleasant affection for your Uncle Edward, forty years her junior; and I believe that non-reciprocity and neglect to ask her to his wedding lost him a fortune. She took up with a musg less unresponsive boy afterwards, to everyones disgust, but the family did take collectively a few thousands under her will, in which she, who was devoted to animals, bequeathed a legacy for "the promotion of cruelty to animals"!

James Baumont was the son of John Beaumont. James married Elisa Charlotte Fisher and had nine children - William Coppard, Mary Anne (Leadman), Edward, Charles George, Macdonald, Fanny Emmeline (Souper), Constance (Jones), Ellen Torlesse, and Emma Kate.

James Beaumont was a most courtly gentleman, ugly but with classic features. His father was better looking and, from his picture, a humourous, easygoing spark, who lost every bob of his money without complaint. The previous ancestors, from miniatures, look much the same type. The only vague hint of aristocracy in our family was given at Blenheim, when J.B.s two sisters were viewing the pictures, and stood amazed at the lifelike likeness of one to J.B. they hastened to the Curator to discover that it was "the Marquis de Beaumont", to their great content...

..Till I was about seven years old we lived at Highgate. I can just remember the jolly old house and garden, afterwards taken by the late Lord Justice Fry. Highgate was then a very conservative, narrow-minded place, where trade was despised, and no-one was reckoned 'in society' unles in some recognised profession. When we moved to Blackheath (before Arundel House) your grandmother was surprised at being taken into dinner by a stockbroker! However he became a great friend, James Nairn Scott. Her views expanded, she became very tolerant and broad-minded, and most sympathetic, but she disliked common people. She died at 92.

John Beaumont, the grandfather of James, was Master of the Cutlers Company in 1768. His son, John, was fined for not accepting the Mastership in 1813. Oriana Souper married Edward Wilson, who died with Scott on the latter's last expedition which reached the South Pole.]"

source: family history notes of Macdonald Beaumont 1934

++++++

1830 James Beaumont got the freedom of the city of London in the Company of Cutlers.

By the mid 19th century most of the cutlers trade has moved north to Sheffield. This from the company website:
'With the demise of the sword making and cutlery trade in the City during the 19th. century, the Company directed its attention towards supporting the surgical instrument trade by indenturing apprentices, and expanding its charitable activities with particular emphasis on supporting education.

Today the Company combines these charitable endeavours with maintaining the traditions of the City of London; supporting the Mayoralty; providing fellowship and hospitality; and preserving the Company's Hall and other assets for the benefit of future generations. With a livery of only 100 members, many of whom have been admitted by patrimony, it is in every sense a family Company and one which is justly proud of its ancient heritage and ancestry.'

++++++

1841 Marriage record:
10th June James Beaumont and Eliza Charlotte Fisher are married at St Michael, Highgate. Both fathers are present; John Beaumont, gentleman, and William Fisher, solicitor

1851 Census:
James Beaumont, solicitor, is visiting Brighton and staying at a hotel.

1861 census:
Beaumont family live at The Grove, Highgate, which seems to be divided between different large families.
James Beaumont is head of the family aged 52, a solicitor, born in Hackney.
Eliza Charlotte his wife is aged 44, born in Vauxhall.
son William is 19, an articled clerk to a solicitor, born in Highgate
Mary Ann, daughter aged 17, also born in Highgate
Constance, daughter aged 14, born Highgate
Fanny aged 12, daughter, born Highgate
Ellen, 11, daughter, born Highgate
Emma Kate, aged 9, born in Brighton
Charles George, aged 6, born in Brighton
MacDonald, aged 3, born in Brighton
And they have 4 servants living with them.

The Grove is a street in Highgate has big houses on it, the poet Samual Taylor Coleridge lived there 1816-34, J B Priestley lived there. It's now very high class, with Kate Moss, Sting, Annie Lennox and George Michael living there.

1871 Census:
the family live at No1. Blessington st. in the parish of Lee, Lewisham.
James Baumont, head, agd 62, solicitor
Eliza C, his wife aged 54
Edward, son, aged 26, a Barrister
Constance, daughter aged 24
Fanny, daughter aged 22
Ellen, daughter agd 21
Emma, daughter aged 19
and three servants.

+++++

1880 Probate record:
James Beaumont, late of Arundal House Lee, in the County of Kent, who died 21 May 1880 at Arandul House was proved at the Principal Registry by Eliza Charlotte Beaumont of Arundal House, Widow the Relict, Charles Shepheard of Beaumont House Grange Rd, Ealing. and William Coppard Beaumont of 23 Lincoln's Inn Fields, and Edward Beaumont of 6 News Square Lincolns Inn, esquires, the sons the executors. Personal Estate under £50,000.

According to an online source on Beaumont family, Arundal House is in Blessington rd, Lewisham. 
Beaumont James
 
50 'John Beaumont, the grandfather of James, was Master of the Cutlers Company in 1768. His son, John, was fined for not accepting the Mastership in 1813'
source: family history notes of Macdonald Beaumont 1934 
Beaumont John
 

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